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Hi I was wondering if there was a way of calling a function/method (preferably in Python or Java) and continue execution without waiting for it.

Example:

def a():
    b()  #call a function, b()
    return "something"

def b():
    #something that takes a really long time
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2  
Check stackoverflow.com/questions/395704/threads-in-python for links to tutorials to work with threads in Python –  gpoo Jul 13 '12 at 2:48
3  
Just as a side-note, the easy way to refer to a method that runs without waiting for the result is 'asynchronous'. May help to know that in your researching. –  APPronaut Jul 13 '12 at 3:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Run it in a new thread. Learn about multithreading in java here and python multithreading here

Java example:

The WRONG way ... by subclassing Thread

new Thread() {
    public void run() {
        YourFunction();//Call your function
    }
}.start();

The RIGHT way ... by supplying a Runnable instance

Runnable myrunnable = new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        YourFunction();//Call your function
    }
}

new Thread(myrunnable).start();//Call it when you need to run the function
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+1 for using anonymous classes –  jozefg Jul 13 '12 at 3:05
1  
Please don't encourage anyone to subclass Thread directly, that is almost never necessary (and if it is the person will know what they're doing without help from SO), bad practice and can lead to some surprising bugs down the way. –  Voo Jul 13 '12 at 4:00
    
I've taken the liberty to annotate the Answer ... since this is important. –  Stephen C Jul 13 '12 at 4:45
    
@StephenC Thanks for the edit, but why is it wrong to subclass thread? –  Ashwin Singh Jul 13 '12 at 4:47
2  
@Ashwin For one the runnable generally isn't a general thread (nobody else would ever want to use it as a general thread), but the real problem is that your class suddenly inherits several methods that you probably don't think about and that the base class may do surprising things. For example thread uses the instance's object as a lock and waits on it - so if you have a synchronized method, that may lead to some surprises. –  Voo Jul 13 '12 at 11:49

Using multiprocessing in python:

from multiprocessing import Process

def b():
    # long process

p = Process(target=b) 
p.start()
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As noted in other answers, from Python you can either put the function in a new thread (not that good, since threads in CPython do not gain you much), or in another process using Multiprocessing -

from multiprocessing import Process

def b():
    # long process

def a():
    p = Process(target=b) 
    p.start()
    ...
a()

(As put in monkut's answer).

But Python's decorator allow one to hide the boilerplate under the carpet, in a way that at calling time, you "see" just a normal function call. In the example bellow, I create the "parallel" decorator - just place it before any function, and it will authomatically run in a separate process when called:

from multiprocessing import Process
from functools import partial

from time import sleep

def parallel(func):
    def parallel_func(*args, **kw):
        p = Process(target=func, args=args, kwargs=kw)
        p.start()
    return parallel_func

@parallel
def timed_print(x=0):
    for y in range(x, x + 10):
        print y
        sleep(0.2)



def example():
    timed_print(100)
    sleep(0.1)
    timed_print(200)
    for z in range(10):
        print z
        sleep(0.2)


if __name__ == "__main__":
    example()

When running this snippet, one gets:

[gwidion@caylus Documents]$ python parallel.py 
100
0
200
101
1
201
102
2
202
103
3
203
104
4
204
105
5
205
106
6
206
107
7
207
108
8
208
109
9
209
[gwidion@caylus Documents]$ 
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In Java, there's a standard idiom: create a thread and run it:

new Thread() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        callMyFunction();
    }
}.start();

Or you can create a Runnable and pass it to the thread:

Runnable caller = new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        callMyFunction();
    }
}

new Thread(caller).start();
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You'd better start with an ExecutorService instead of going directly with raw threads. It provides pooling, completion detection, and there are subclasses which also have some scheduling. For instance:

...
// Create a simple instance with a single thread in the pool
ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(1); 
...
Future<Integer> future = executor.submit(new Callable<Integer>() {
    @Override
    public Integer call() {
        return YourFunction();
    }
});
...

// To wait for YourFunction() to finish, and get the result:
Integer result = future.get();

You can submit as many asynchronous tasks to the ExecutorService as you like; they will be executed in parallel, or sequentially, depending on the implementation you choose, on the number of threads in the backing thread pool, etc.

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just call that function in the new thread...

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