Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table that has a well defined index, what I understand from

org.hiber....table(appliesTo="tableName", indexes={@Index(name=" ",columnNames=" "})})

is that it creates an index, now will doing this and mentioning the column names used in the actual oracle DB index give me the optimal results or is the Index never used ? How do i use the index explicitly in HQL ? Also how do i ascertain the index is being used ?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

It depends on what DBMS you are using. For example, in Oracle, you cannot control which index to use through the SQL if you are using cost-based optimizer. So it is even less likely you can do anything related to this through HQL.

To assure if indices are used, it is also depends on the DBMS. Normally I will get the actual SQL issued to DBMS, by dumping it in log through Hibernate or other JDBC logging tools (e.g. JdbcDsLog), and view the execution plan of the SQL

share|improve this answer
    
am i right when I say using the annotation I mentioned above creates an index rather than use the existing one ? –  Aadi Droid Jul 13 '12 at 3:47
    
AFAIK, yes..... –  Adrian Shum Jul 13 '12 at 4:20
    
as per my knowledge you use sql hints in oracle queries to mention the indexes, is there a way to do the same using HQL ? My DBMS is Oracle –  Aadi Droid Jul 13 '12 at 4:32
    
I don't think you can. And, in Oracle, if you are using cost based optimizer (which is default after 9i iirc), I believe sql hints for indices is no longer meaningful (please correct me if I am wrong) –  Adrian Shum Jul 13 '12 at 4:43
    
@AdrianShum you can definetely use sql hint in oracle. i used them and saw the big time difference between executiun times like 1minute to 7second. –  halil Nov 21 '12 at 9:29
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.