Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code:

var license_price = 0;
    var num_licenses = jQuery('#num_licenses').val();
    var lp = {};

                lp[1]=12.50;
                lp[10]=15.50;
                lp[50]=50.00;

    for(var index in lp) {alert(index);
        if (num_licenses >= index){
            license_price = parseFloat(lp[index]);
        }
    }
    //alert(license_price);
    jQuery('#total_price').val((num_licenses * license_price));

This code determines the value entered in the num_licenses box, then goes through the array lp and assigns a price based on the value of each key. So, if num_licenses = 8, the price should be 12.50 each, if the num_licess = 60, the price should be $60.

It works for all values except 2 - 9. If I enter 2-9, the price from fp[10] is used. But, if it is 1, then I get 12.50.

take care, lee

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you iterate over the object's indices they are typed as strings. Your > comparison is actually sorting them alphabetically rather than numerically. Parse its numeric value to get this working. (alphabetically '2' occurs after all values starting with '1', including '10', so '2' > '10', etc.)

for(var index in lp) {
    alert(index);
    if(lp.hasOwnProperty(index)) { // prevent comparison when property inherited
        if (num_licenses >= parseInt(index,10) ){
            license_price = parseFloat(lp[index]);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks nBrooks. –  Lee Loftiss Jul 13 '12 at 3:48
    
The > operator will compare alphabetically if used on two strings, but numerically if used with a string and a number. In this case both of your values were strings, so parsing one worked fine. If you want to use num_licenses numerically later on you will have to parse that as well. –  nbrooks Jul 13 '12 at 4:09

The problem is that you are comparing a string to an integer. The result of the val() function is a string. Therefore, if your input is '2' , the result of '2' <= 10 is false. You should convert it first to an integer using the parseInt() function.

Here's what it should look like:

var license_price = 0;
var num_licenses = parseInt(jQuery('#num_licenses').val(),10);
var lp = {};

            lp[1]=12.50;
            lp[10]=15.50;
            lp[50]=50.00;

for(var index in lp) {alert(index);
    if (num_licenses >= index){
        alert("Greater than " + index);//added this for debugging
        license_price = parseFloat(lp[index]);
    }
}
//alert(license_price);
jQuery('#total_price').val((num_licenses * license_price));

Note that I added a parseInt() call to the value. I also added some alert calls so you can see what is happening.

Here is a link to a jsFiddle snippet so that you can test it out: http://jsfiddle.net/CmbvW/8/

share|improve this answer
    
really? I didn't know that. How can it return a number? –  Russell Santos Jul 13 '12 at 3:58
    
I'm just quoting the documentation. I assume it tries to parse it and checks if the result is NaN. –  nbrooks Jul 13 '12 at 4:00
    
Actually, typeof says its value is a string even when I type in an integer. Maybe on a textbox it always returns string but for other types it might return number. I'll have to look into that... –  nbrooks Jul 13 '12 at 4:05

In your code lp is a Object not a array, so index is a property name with type String.

Try to change your code to

var lp = [];

then the index will be a number.

share|improve this answer
    
...Except using a true array will leave gaps for all the indices that are not filled in. lp is [,12.50,,, ... ,,,15.50,,, ... ,,, 50.00] –  nbrooks Jul 13 '12 at 3:45
    
You dont need to write like that. var lp = [];lp[1]=12.50;lp[10]=15.50;lp[50]=50.00; is OK –  Charlie Jul 13 '12 at 3:48
    
Didn't mean that as an assignment -- meant that that's what the value of lp will be, even if you initialize it by referencing the index directly. The rest of the spaces are undefined, but still exist -- which seems like it would be a waste of memory. In any case an array isn't really the right kind of structure for this –  nbrooks Jul 13 '12 at 3:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.