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I am using Google Guava library for caching. For automatic cache refresh we can do as follows:

cache = CacheBuilder.newBuilder()               
                    .refreshAfterWrite(15, TimeUnit.MINUTES)
                    .maximumSize(100)
                    .build(....);

However, automatic refreshes are performed when the first stale request for an entry occurs.

Is there a way to refresh it automatically even though no requests came for cache data? Like for every 15 minutes the cache data should be pulled from Db and load it, no matter whether anybody called cache data or not.

Also, Guava's cache expiry time is for entire cache. Is it possible to expire cache values based on key? Like cache data with key "NOT_SO_FREQ_CHANGE_DATA" to expire for every 1 hour and data with key "FREQ_CHANGING_DATA" should expire for every 15 minutes?

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Can u please give me the solution how you solved this? – leostiw Jul 15 '13 at 9:38
up vote 12 down vote accepted

Guava provides no way to refresh the cache in bulk, but you can schedule a periodic refresh yourself:

LoadingCache<K, V> cache = CacheBuilder.newBuilder()
        .refreshAfterWrite(15, TimeUnit.MINUTES)
        .maximumSize(100)
        .build(new MyCacheLoader());

for (K key : cache.asMap().keySet()) {
    cache.refresh(key);
}

But in that case you may want to override the CacheBuilder.reload(K, V) method in MyCacheLoader so it performs asynchronously.

As for the second question, no, you cannot set a per-entry expiration in Guava.

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6  
FYI, bulk cache refresh operations are under discussion in Guava issue 971. – Louis Wasserman Jul 13 '12 at 16:16

1st question. Use a scheduled executor to kick off a periodic refresh.

2nd question. If you can infer your expiration policy from you cache key, or the previously cached value, it is possible to refresh you data at varying intervals.

based on this: https://code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/wiki/CachesExplained#Refresh

LoadingCache<Key, Graph> graphs = CacheBuilder.newBuilder()
   .refreshAfterWrite(1, TimeUnit.MINUTES)
   .build(
       new CacheLoader<Key, Graph>() {
         public Graph load(Key key) { // no checked exception
           return getGraphFromDatabase(key);
         }

         public ListenableFuture<Graph> reload(final Key key, Graph prevGraph) {
           if (!needsRefresh(key,prevGraph)) {
             return Futures.immediateFuture(prevGraph);
           } else {
             // asynchronous!
             ListenableFutureTask<Graph> task = ListenableFutureTask.create(new Callable<Graph>() {
               public Graph call() {
                 return getGraphFromDatabase(key);
               }
             });
             executor.execute(task);
             return task;
           }
         }
       });

ScheduledExecutorService ses = Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();
ses.scheduleWithFixedDelay(
    new Runnable() {
        public void run() {
            for (Key key : graphs.asMap().keySet()) {
                graphs.refresh(key);
            }
        }
    }, 0, UPDATE_INTERVAL, TimeUnit.MINUTES);
share|improve this answer
    
i looked in the reload method, when needsRefresh(key) is true , it will go to else statement , then it will go to execute the task , but i don't see it return the old value . i was thinking it should return the old value first and go for the new value asychronously . – JasonHuang Sep 18 '14 at 5:52
    
as noted in code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/wiki/CachesExplained#Refresh the guava cache reload inherently does return the old value, while refreshing the cache asynchronously. Refreshing is not quite the same as eviction. As specified in LoadingCache.refresh(K), refreshing a key loads a new value for the key, possibly asynchronously. The old value (if any) is still returned while the key is being refreshed, in contrast to eviction, which forces retrievals to wait until the value is loaded anew. – McKidoubled Nov 21 '14 at 19:22

Here is some sample code to refresh a cache. Guava cache is easy to implement and also it is fast.

import java.util.concurrent.ExecutionException
import java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;

import com.google.common.cache.CacheBuilder;
import com.google.common.cache.CacheLoader;
import com.google.common.cache.LoadingCache;

public class GuavaTest {
    private static GuavaTest INSTANCE = new GuavaTest();

    public static GuavaTest getInstance(){
        return INSTANCE;
    }   

    private LoadingCache<String,String> cache;

    private GuavaTest() {
        cache = CacheBuilder.newBuilder()
                .refreshAfterWrite(2,TimeUnit.SECONDS)
                .build(new CacheLoader<String, String>() {
                        @Override
                        public String load(String arg0) throws Exception {
                            return addCache(arg0);
                        }
                });
    }

    private String addCache(String arg0) {
        System.out.println("Adding Cache");
        return arg0.toUpperCase();
    }

    public String getEntry(String args) throws ExecutionException{
        System.out.println(cache.size());
        return cache.get(args);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        GuavaTest gt = GuavaTest.getInstance();
        try {
            System.out.println(gt.getEntry("java"));
            System.out.println(gt.getEntry("java"));
            Thread.sleep(2100);
            System.out.println(gt.getEntry("java"));
            System.out.println(gt.getEntry("java"));
        } catch (ExecutionException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

}

I referred this article guava cache example

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Does this code address the questions from the OP's question? If so, could you expand on how the cache is refreshed without data being requested and is it possible to expire cache values based on key. – gar Nov 18 '15 at 18:30

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