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I am attempting to split a list into a series of smaller lists.

My Problem: My function to split lists doesn't split them into lists of the correct size. It should split them into lists of size 30 but instead it splits them into lists of size 114?

How can I make my function split a list into X number of Lists of size 30 or less?

public static List<List<float[]>> splitList(List <float[]> locations, int nSize=30) 
{       
    List<List<float[]>> list = new List<List<float[]>>();

    for (int i=(int)(Math.Ceiling((decimal)(locations.Count/nSize))); i>=0; i--) {
        List <float[]> subLocat = new List <float[]>(locations); 

        if (subLocat.Count >= ((i*nSize)+nSize))
            subLocat.RemoveRange(i*nSize, nSize);
        else subLocat.RemoveRange(i*nSize, subLocat.Count-(i*nSize));

        Debug.Log ("Index: "+i.ToString()+", Size: "+subLocat.Count.ToString());
        list.Add (subLocat);
    }

    return list;
}

If I use the function on a list of size 144 then the output is:

Index: 4, Size: 120
Index: 3, Size: 114
Index: 2, Size: 114
Index: 1, Size: 114
Index: 0, Size: 114

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If a LINQ solution is acceptable, this question may be of some help. –  Charmander Jul 13 '12 at 3:28
    
Specifically Sam Saffron's answer on that previous question. And unless this is for a school assignment, I would just use his code and stop. –  jcolebrand Jul 13 '12 at 3:35
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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted
public static List<List<float[]>> splitList(List <float[]> locations, int nSize=30)  
{        
    List<List<float[]>> list = new List<List<float[]>>(); 

    for (int i=0; i < locations.Count; i+= nSize) 
    { 
        list.Add(locations.GetRange(i, Math.Min(nSize, locations.Count - i))); 
    } 

    return list; 
} 
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haw about:

while(locations.Any())
{    
    list.Add(locations.Take(nSize).ToList());
    locations= locations.Skip(nSize).ToList();
}
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Is this going to consume lots of memory? Each time locations.Skip.ToList happens I wonder if more memory is allocated and unskipped items are referenced by a new list. –  Zasz Feb 12 at 7:40
    
yes new list is created on every loop. Yes it consumes memory. But if you are having memory issues this is not the place to optimize as instances of that lists are ready to be collected on next loop. You can trade performance for memory by skipping the ToList but I wouldn't bother trying to optimize it - it is so trivial and unlikely is a bottleneck. The main gain from this implementation is its triviality it is easy to understand. If you want you can use the accepted answer it does not create those lists but is a bit more complex. –  Rafal Feb 12 at 10:59
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I have a generic method that would take any types include float, and it's been unit-tested, hope it helps:

    /// <summary>
    /// Breaks the list into groups with each group containing no more than the specified group size
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="values">The values.</param>
    /// <param name="groupSize">Size of the group.</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static List<List<T>> SplitList<T>(IEnumerable<T> values, int groupSize, int? maxCount = null)
    {
        List<List<T>> result = new List<List<T>>();
        // Quick and special scenario
        if (values.Count() <= groupSize)
        {
            result.Add(values.ToList());
        }
        else
        {
            List<T> valueList = values.ToList();
            int startIndex = 0;
            int count = valueList.Count;
            int elementCount = 0;

            while (startIndex < count && (!maxCount.HasValue || (maxCount.HasValue && startIndex < maxCount)))
            {
                elementCount = (startIndex + groupSize > count) ? count - startIndex : groupSize;
                result.Add(valueList.GetRange(startIndex, elementCount));
                startIndex += elementCount;
            }
        }


        return result;
    }
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I would suggest to use this extension method to chunk the source list to the sub-lists by specified chunk size:

/// <summary>
/// Helper methods for the lists.
/// </summary>
public static class ListExtensions
{
    public static List<List<T>> ChunkBy<T>(this List<T> source, int chunkSize) 
    {
        return source
            .Select((x, i) => new { Index = i, Value = x })
            .GroupBy(x => x.Index / chunkSize)
            .Select(x => x.Select(v => v.Value).ToList())
            .ToList();
    }
}
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