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I have a data frame with a date column and some other value columns. I would like to extract from the data frame those rows in which the date column matches any of the elements in a pre-existing list of dates. For example, using a list of one element, the date '2012-01-01' would pull the row with a date of '2012-01-01' from the data frame.

For numbers I think I know how to match the values. This code:

testdf <- data.frame(mydate = seq(as.Date('2012-01-01'), 
                                  as.Date('2012-01-10'), by = 'day'),
                     col1 = 1:10,
                     col2 = 11:20,
                     col3 = 21:30)

...produces this data frame:

       mydate col1 col2 col3
1  2012-01-01    1   11   21
2  2012-01-02    2   12   22
3  2012-01-03    3   13   23
4  2012-01-04    4   14   24
5  2012-01-05    5   15   25
6  2012-01-06    6   16   26
7  2012-01-07    7   17   27
8  2012-01-08    8   18   28
9  2012-01-09    9   19   29
10 2012-01-10   10   20   30

I can do this:

testdf[which(testdf$col3 %in% c('25','29')),]

which produces this:

      mydate col1 col2 col3
5 2012-01-05    5   15   25
9 2012-01-09    9   19   29

I can generalise this to a list like this:

myvalues <- c('25','29')
testdf[which(testdf$col3 %in% myvalues),]

And I get the same output. So I had thought I would be able to use the same approach for dates, but it appears that I was wrong. Doing this:

testdf[which(testdf$mydate %in% c('2012-01-05','2012-01-09')),]

Gets me this:

[1] mydate col1   col2   col3  
<0 rows> (or 0-length row.names)

And popping the dates in their own list - which is the ultimate aim - doesn't help either. I can think of ways round this with loops or an apply function, but it seems to me that there must be a simpler way for what is probably a fairly common requirement. Is it that I have again overlooked something simple?

Q: How can I subset those rows of a data frame that have a date column the values of which match one of a list of dates?

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I actually learnt sub-setting from your question. Thank you! –  Legend Jan 19 '13 at 6:56
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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You have to convert the date string into a Date variable using as.Date (try ?as.Date at the console). Bonus: you can drop which:

> testdf[testdf$mydate %in% as.Date(c('2012-01-05', '2012-01-09')),]
      mydate col1 col2 col3
5 2012-01-05    5   15   25
9 2012-01-09    9   19   29
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Thanks, I did consider conversion to string, but the docs for match say "Factors, raw vectors and lists are converted to character vectors" and dates are not explicitly mentioned as an exception so I just assumed it would be OK. Not so... –  SlowLearner Jul 13 '12 at 6:01
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Both suggestions so far are definitely good, but if you are going to be doing a lot of work with dates, you may want to invest some time with the xts package:

# Some sample data for 90 consecutive days 
set.seed(1)
testdf <- data.frame(mydate = seq(as.Date('2012-01-01'), 
                                  length.out=90, by = 'day'),
                     col1 = rnorm(90), col2 = rnorm(90),
                     col3 = rnorm(90))

# Convert the data to an xts object
require(xts)
testdfx = xts(testdf, order.by=testdf$mydate)

# Take a random sample of dates
testdfx[sample(index(testdfx), 5)]
#                   col1        col2        col3
# 2012-01-17 -0.01619026  0.71670748  1.44115771
# 2012-01-29 -0.47815006  0.49418833 -0.01339952
# 2012-02-05 -0.41499456  0.71266631  1.51974503
# 2012-02-27 -1.04413463  0.01739562 -1.18645864
# 2012-03-26  0.33295037 -0.03472603  0.27005490

# Get specific dates
testdfx[c('2012-01-05', '2012-01-09')]
#                 col1      col2       col3
# 2012-01-05 0.3295078  1.586833  0.5210227
# 2012-01-09 0.5757814 -1.224613 -0.4302118

You can also get dates from another vector.

# Get dates from another vector
lookup = c("2012-01-12", "2012-01-31", "2012-03-05", "2012-03-19")
testdfx[lookup]
testdfx[lookup]
#                   col1        col2       col3
# 2012-01-12  0.38984324  0.04211587  0.4020118
# 2012-01-31  1.35867955 -0.50595746 -0.1643758
# 2012-03-05 -0.74327321 -1.48746031  1.1629646
# 2012-03-19  0.07434132 -0.14439960  0.3747244

The xts package will give you intelligent subsetting options. For instance, testdfx["2012-03"] will return all the data from March; testdfx["2012"] will return for the year; testdfx["/2012-02-15"] will return the data from the start of the dataset to February 15; and testdfx["2012-02-15/"] will go from February 15 to the end of the dataset.

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I do use xts every day but I had forgotten about those little extras so +1 for the useful reminder –  SlowLearner Jul 13 '12 at 8:38
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Or you can go the other way round to what @RYogi suggested and convert the Date into a string:

testdf[as.character(testdf$mydate) %in% c('2012-01-05', '2012-01-09'),]
      mydate col1 col2 col3
5 2012-01-05    5   15   25
9 2012-01-09    9   19   29

Edit: timing

Converting Date to a string is slightly faster, but it doesn't really make a difference:

library(rbenchmark)
benchmark(asDate=testdf[testdf$mydate %in% as.Date(c('2012-01-05', '2012-01-09')),],
  asString=testdf[as.character(testdf$mydate) %in% c('2012-01-05', '2012-01-09'),], 
  replications=1000)

#     test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child
# 1   asDate         1000   0.211 1.076531     0.212        0          0
# 2 asString         1000   0.196 1.000000     0.192        0          0
#  sys.child
# 1         0
# 2         0
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Converting to Date is probably more expensive computationally, but in this case the number of conversions should be smaller. –  Ryogi Jul 13 '12 at 5:47
    
@jmsigner thank you for this - I find them equally useful but the other answer was just a little quicker. –  SlowLearner Jul 13 '12 at 6:02
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