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I am having a weird problem with my Qt app. I have a QMainWindow, conveniently MainWindow.

The following code works from the main() function:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])

{
    ..
    MainWindow mainWindow;
    mainWindow.show();
    ..
}

But, with the following does not show the MainWindow at all:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    AnotherClass::staticFunction();
}


class AnotherClass: public QObject {
Q_OBJECT
public:
    static void staticFunction();
}

void AnotherClass::staticFunction() {
    MainWindow mainWindow;
    mainWindow.show();
    return ;
}
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i think you need to run QCoreApplication::exec(); –  Donotalo Jul 13 '12 at 6:31
    
While staticFunction itself is static, the mainWindow variable inside it isn't, so as soon as you return from the function, the variable goes out of scope. –  Mr Lister Jul 13 '12 at 6:33
    
Thanks guys, I just already figured that out! :) –  Tarandeep Gill Jul 13 '12 at 6:34

2 Answers 2

In this code

void AnotherClass::staticFunction() {
    MainWindow mainWindow;
    mainWindow.show();
    return ;
}

The instance mainWindow will go out of scope after the closing }, and then destroyed. You will have to allocate it on the heap using new to have it outlive staticFunction().

void AnotherClass::staticFunction() {
    MainWindow * mainWindow = new MainWindow;
    mainWindow->show();
    return ;
}

You will also need to somehow keep track of the pointer and having it deleted later (perhaps using a smart pointer).

And of course you will have to have a QApplication and call exec() on it in order to start the main event loop.

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1  
I don't think that's a very elegant solution. You are creating a memory leak. –  Mr Lister Jul 13 '12 at 6:35
    
@MrLister That's why I said he needs to keep track of pointer and delete it later. I agree it's not so elegant, I would have mainWindow as a local variable in main(), or as a member variable in QApplication subclass (if it is a complex application where I can have different main windows). –  Claudio Jul 13 '12 at 7:29
    
I am overriding the closeEvent method, and destroying the window in it. –  Tarandeep Gill Jul 13 '12 at 9:04
    
@TarandeepGill if you're only going to do this once there's no point in deleting resources before your program exits (you will just slow down the exiting). It's ok to 'leak' certain single-application-instance things like the main window. –  MrFox Jul 13 '12 at 14:51

Oh my bad! Its because main never returns and enters the exec loop. However, since my function was returning immediately, the window was getting destroyed. Changing MainWindow mainWindow; to MainWindow* mainWindow = new MainWindow(); solved my problem:

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... and caused a mem leak –  inf Jul 13 '12 at 7:25
    
No... I am overriding the closeEvent method, and destroying the window in it. –  Tarandeep Gill Jul 13 '12 at 9:03
    
ok, you should mention that. By the way, you can just set the WA_DeleteOnClose attribute which will handle just that. –  inf Jul 13 '12 at 9:20

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