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I have two view controllers and nibs. I populated one view controller with a toggle switch and declared this in its header file:

@public UISwitch *toggleSwitch;

and exposed it as a property like this:

@property (nonatomic,retain) IBOutlet UISwitch *toggleSwitch;

I also connected the switch with toggleSwitch outlet. Now I want to use this toggleSwitch field in my other view controller, how do I do that? Isn't using @public in the field declaration enough? Please help. Thank you.

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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

No problem at all. Just use the switch like this:

vcWhereYouDeclaredTheSwitch.toggleSwitch.on = YES;

or

BOOL test = [vcWhereYouDeclaredTheSwitch.toggleSwitch isOn];

inside your other view controller.

Here are some general thoughts about propertys:

  • Memory management : Behind the scenes it will create a setter which creates the variable with correct memory management. It will save you some headaches because you can easily see how the memory management is done (strong/weak and retain/copy/assign).

  • Accessibility from other classes: if you declare your @property in the .h and @synthesize it in the .m you ivar will be public readable and writeable. You can prevent this with a privat class extension. You even can declare a @property public readonly and declare them internally readwrite via a privat class extension. Eg: a private property

   // [In the implementation file]  
   @interface MyClass ()  
   @property (nonatomic, retain) NSMutableArray* someData; // private!!   
   @end  

   @implementation MyClass @synthesize someData   
   @end
  • Custom getter and setter: If you like you can still write custom getter and setters and you can even just write a getter or setter and let the other one automatically @synthesize. And you can write custom logic into such a getter and setter e.g. you can reload a tableview after a @property has changed.

  • Automatic Key-Value-Observing (KVO) compliant: If you use or planning to use KVO you get it basically for free by just declaring the property. Nothing else need to be done!

  • If you need you iVar to be public it is simpler to write one @property than writing a getter and setter for a iVar

  • With a @property you do not need to declare in iVar (in iOS and 64bit Mac Os X applications). You can do it via the @synthesize:

    @synthesize myiVar = _myIvar;
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thanks! It worked fine but I checked if it still works without @public in the declaration of toggleSwitch and it did. Why? Is it simply because I'm importing that vc in other vc so it doesn't matter? And other thing, though it worked fine with the switch being ON by default but when I switched off the switch it threw an exception: "Thread 1: signal SIGABRT" in the main.m file. I get this error quite often while working with Xcode, this error is a real pain in my ass. Please help. –  Sahil Chaudhary Jul 13 '12 at 7:10
    
added some info about iVas and propertys - about your other error: it may be more useful if you make a new question out of it so everyone can help you and/or use the information later. –  Pfitz Jul 13 '12 at 7:17
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You have made the property of UISwitch. So, you can use it anywhere by using the viewcontroller object.

Suppose you wanna use it in the view where you are currently then use it

self.toggleSwitch

// or

viewControllerObject.toggleSwitch

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I see. Thanks. Another quick question-->though everything worked fine with the switch being ON by default but when I switched off the switch it threw an exception: "Thread 1: signal SIGABRT" in the main.m file. I get this error quite often while working with Xcode, this error is a real pain in my ass. Please help –  Sahil Chaudhary Jul 13 '12 at 7:16
    
you must be passing some wrong parameters. Can you please share code where exactly you are using it –  Slim Shaddy Jul 13 '12 at 7:55
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