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I've got a model

class Category(models.Model):
    title           = models.CharField(...)
    entry           = models.ManyToManyField(Entry,null=True,blank=True,
                                             related_name='category_entries',
                                             )

That I wish to refactor to have additional data with each relationship:

class Category(models.Model):
    title           = models.CharField(...)
    entry           = models.ManyToManyField(Entry,null=True,blank=True,
                                             related_name='category_entries',
                                             through='CategoryEntry',
                                             )

But south deletes the existing table. How can I preserve the existing m-t-m relationships?

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Related question at stackoverflow.com/questions/2224410/… –  Bryce Jul 13 '12 at 7:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted
  1. Create your intermediate model without any extra fields, for now. Give it a unique constraint to match the existing one and specify the table name to match the existing one:

    class CategoryEntry(models.Model):
        category = models.ForeignKey(Category)
        entry = models.ForeignKey(Entry)   
    
        class Meta:
            db_table='main_category_entries'   #change main_ to your application
            unique_together = (('category', 'entry'))
    
  2. Run the South schema migration.

  3. Edit the generated schema migration script and comment-out all the forwards and backwards entries, since you'll be re-using the existing intersection table. Add pass to complete the methods.

  4. Run the migration.

  5. Update any existing code. As it says in https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/topics/db/models/#many-to-many-relationships, "Unlike normal many-to-many fields, you can't use add, create, or assignment to create relationships" so you'll need to modify any existing application code, e.g.

    c.entry.add(e)
    

    could become:

    try:
        categoryentry = c.categoryentry_set.get(entry = e)
    except CategoryEntry.DoesNotExist:
        categoryentry = CategoryEntry(category=c, entry=e)
        categoryentry.save()
    

    and:

    e.category_entries.add(c)
    

    could become:

    categoryentry = CategoryEntry(category=c, entry=e)  #set extra fields here
    categoryentry.save()                
    

    and:

    c.entry.remove(e)
    

    could become:

    categoryentry = c.categoryentry_set.get(entry = e)
    categoryentry.delete()
    
  6. Once this initial pseudo migration has been done, you should then be able to add the extra fields to the CategoryEntry and create further migrations as normal.

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I had this problem in Django 1.7+ where migrations are a part of Django core, after some research I managed to solve it. In case anybody else is having trouble here is a solution:

Since the "code" state if the database is handled differently in South (the full state is saved on each migration) and Django 1.7 (it is calculated from all migrations) you need to tell the code_state in Django that a model has been added even though it has not.

Like above this will need to be done in a few steps.

  1. Create an intermediate model like in the answer above:

    class CategoryEntry(models.Model):
    category = models.ForeignKey(Category)
    entry = models.ForeignKey(Entry)   
    
    class Meta:
        db_table='main_category_entries'   #change main_ to your application
        unique_together = (('category', 'entry'))
    
  2. Create an autmigration and modifie the code. Replace the operations list by a list with a single migrations.SeparateDatabaseAndState(database_operations, state_operations) with the autogenerated operations list as state_operations arguement and with an empty database_operations list. It will look like:

    class Migration(migrations.Migration):
        operations = [
            migrations.SeparateDatabaseAndState(
               state_operations = [ <original operations list> ],
               datebase_operations= []
            ),
        ]
    
  3. Edit the CategoryEntry to contain what you want and create a new automigration.

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I'd do it in the following way:

  1. Add the "CategoryEntry" class to the model, and do an auto schema migration. This will add an empty table containing the properties of "CategoryEntry". To be noted, the older M2M table remains untouched since "through='CategoryEntry'" has not yet been added.

  2. Do a data migration to copy all data from the existing M2M table to the table created in step 1. To do so, run the datamigration command, and edit methods forward() and backward() in the auto generated migration script accordingly.

  3. Now add through='CategoryEntry' part (just the way you wanted), and do a schemamigration. this will drop the old M2M table.

I hope it helps. Good luck...

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