Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to extend Jan Berkel's Android Plugin for Scala that uses SBT.

I have similar actions and settings like already defined android:install-device and android:install-emulator.
Let them be called android:dev-install-device and android:dev-install-emulator.

I have added new keys in AndroidKeys.scala:

val devInstallDevice = TaskKey[Unit]("dev-install-device")
val devInstallEmulator = TaskKey[Unit]("dev-install-emulator")

val devStartDevice = TaskKey[Unit]("dev-start-device", "Start package on device after installation")
val devStartEmulator = TaskKey[Unit]("dev-start-emulator", "Start package on emulator after installation")

I have also added things in AndroidLaunch.scala:

lazy val settings: Seq[Setting[_]] =
    //AndroidInstall.settings ++
    AndroidFastInstall.settings ++
    inConfig(Android) (Seq (
        devStartDevice <<= startTask(false),
        devStartEmulator <<= startTask(true),
        //startDevice <<= startTask(false),
        //startEmulator <<= startTask(true),

        devStartDevice <<= devStartDevice dependsOn devInstallDevice,
        devStartEmulator <<= devStartEmulator dependsOn devInstallEmulator
        //startDevice <<= startDevice dependsOn installDevice,
        //startEmulator <<= startEmulator dependsOn installEmulator
    ))

The problem is, if I want my own tasks to be available, I have to comment out the original, standard ones, which I don't want to.

Is there anything I'm overlooking?


Update:
I've tried different order of settings.

When AndroidFastInstall comes before AndroidInstall, AndroidInstall is executed regardless I call android:install-device or android:dev-install-device.

  lazy val settings: Seq[Setting[_]] =
    AndroidFastInstall.settings ++
    inConfig(Android) (Seq (
      devStartDevice <<= devStartTask(false),
      devStartEmulator <<= devStartTask(true),

      devStartDevice <<= devStartDevice dependsOn devInstallDevice,
      devStartEmulator <<= devStartEmulator dependsOn devInstallEmulator
    ))++
    AndroidInstall.settings ++
    inConfig(Android) (Seq (
      startDevice <<= startTask(false),
      startEmulator <<= startTask(true),

      startDevice <<= startDevice dependsOn installDevice,
      startEmulator <<= startEmulator dependsOn installEmulator
    )) 

When AndroidInstall comes before AndroidFastInstall, AndroidFastInstall is executed regardless I call android:install-device or android:dev-install-device.

  lazy val settings: Seq[Setting[_]] =
    AndroidInstall.settings ++
    inConfig(Android) (Seq (
      startDevice <<= startTask(false),
      startEmulator <<= startTask(true),

      startDevice <<= startDevice dependsOn installDevice,
      startEmulator <<= startEmulator dependsOn installEmulator
    )) ++
    AndroidFastInstall.settings ++
    inConfig(Android) (Seq (
      devStartDevice <<= devStartTask(false),
      devStartEmulator <<= devStartTask(true),

      devStartDevice <<= devStartDevice dependsOn devInstallDevice,
      devStartEmulator <<= devStartEmulator dependsOn devInstallEmulator
    ))

It appears that the last ones added always cover the visibilty of those prior to them. Does anyone know the solution to this?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+50

This question needs some additional information.

Here's the complete source code: https://github.com/ioreskovic/android-plugin

Apparently, you've copied the settings from in AndroidInstall to devSettings in AndroidFastInstall. You then added the new task keys in AndroidLaunch.

The problem you are having is that apparently calling dev-install-device does exactly the same thing as install-device. This is not because one covers the visibility of the other (they are both visible, it's just that they do the same thing). The problem is that they both depend on the same set of other task keys, and you change those task keys twice - the last change shadows the one before.

More specifically, your problem is here:

lazy val settings: Seq[Setting[_]] =
  AndroidFastInstall.devSettings ++
  ...
  AndroidInstall.settings ++
  ...

Take a look what's inside of these settings and devSettings sequences:

AndroidFastInstall:

lazy val devSettings: Seq[Setting[_]] = inConfig(Android) (devInstallerTasks ++ Seq (
  uninstallEmulator <<= devUninstallTask(emulator = true),
  uninstallDevice <<= devUninstallTask(emulator = false),
  ...
  >>>   proguard <<= proguardTask   <<<

AndroidInstall:

lazy val settings: Seq[Setting[_]] = inConfig(Android) (installerTasks ++ Seq (
  uninstallEmulator <<= uninstallTask(emulator = true),
  uninstallDevice <<= uninstallTask(emulator = false),
  ...
  >>>   proguard <<= proguardTask   <<<

Here you're redefining a task key called proguard which both dev-install-device and install-device depend on. The first proguardTask method is in AndroidFastInstall, the second is in AndroidInstall and they do different things. Since you call the second one last, it redefines what the proguard task means.

(I'm drawing attention to the proguard task key which both dev-install-device and install-device transitively depend on, but there are other examples of such task keys in settings and devSettings.)

To understand this better, you have to understand what settings and tasks really are and how they work:

See "Defining a key" for examples of how to declare a task key.

See "Implementing a task" and "Computing a value based on other keys' values: <<=" for examples of how to implement a task.

This gist of it is - a task key is first declared and implemented later via := and <<=. The <<= may be called multiple times - each call to <<= reimplements the task key.

To make your problems go away, create separate proguard keys for dev and regular versions of your tasks. And do the same thing for the conflicting tasks other than proguard.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that was it. :D –  Lopina Jul 19 '12 at 9:54
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.