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I have a property that I use to define a set of fields that are used on the class.

Eventually, when the class is extended, PHP allows you to redefine this property, but I don't want to allow that, because fields available on parent may be lost on overloading.

This is an example:

class A {
    protected $_fields = array('a', 'b');
}

class B extends A {
    protected $_fields = array('c', 'd'); // I'm loosing 'a' and 'b' fields
}

Can I check at construction time if the property has been overloaded? Maybe by using a reflection method?

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Did you try preventing the overload by using the magic method __set() in the parent class? –  Destralak Jul 13 '12 at 8:41
1  
Yes, you could figure that out using reflection in the constructor, but the constructor may as well be overridden. So that's kinda moot if you want to prevent someone from overriding it. You cannot make people not shoot their own foot. I'd understand if you were wanting to do that to automatically merge the two to get a superset... –  deceze Jul 13 '12 at 8:44
    
@deceze How could I figure out that using reflection? –  Roberto Adarve Jul 13 '12 at 9:13
    
Using ReflectionClass to getProperties and check on the properties the declaringClass. I'll let you figure out the details using the manual... :) –  deceze Jul 13 '12 at 9:16
    
@deceze Thank you! Good tip! I'll have a look at the manual for more details :-) –  Roberto Adarve Jul 13 '12 at 9:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you don't want to allow the extending class to redefine the property, define the property as private. A private property is only accessible inside the defining class, and any redefinition of the property in the class that extends the parent will not change the value the parent class accesses.

class A {
    private $_fields = array('a', 'b');

    function foo() { var_dump($this->_fields); }
}

class B extends A {
    protected $_fields = array('c', 'd'); // I'm loosing 'a' and 'b' fields

    function foo2() { var_dump($this->_fields); }
}

$b = new B();
$b->foo();
$b->foo2();

Will output:

array(2) {
  [0]=>
  string(1) "a"
  [1]=>
  string(1) "b"
}
array(2) {
  [0]=>
  string(1) "c"
  [1]=>
  string(1) "d"
}

.. since the first access will read the property in the parent class (which can't be overridden in the class inheriting the value), and the extender will still be able to get the value of any local property, regardless of the naming in the parent class.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I didn't know that behavior. In fact, I thought that you couldn't do something like that: define a property as private and "re-declare" it on a child's class. –  Roberto Adarve Jul 13 '12 at 8:59

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