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So I have the following array defined as follows:

        var a = new Array();
            a[1] = new Array();

            a[1][0] = "Computer Science";
            a[1][1] = "Computer Engineering";
            a[1][2] = "Aerospace Engineering";
            a[1][3] = "Engineering (Other)";
            a[1][4] = "Web Development";
            a[1][5] = "Computer Programming";
            a[1][6] = "Android Development";
                    //a[2] through a[n] defined similarly

and at one point, I'm trying to test if a string is contained anywhere in a[i], say "Computer Science", so I do the following:

                 for(j=1; j<n; j++)
                    if("Computer Science" in a[j])
                    {
                              //DO SOMETHING
                    }

However, this ALWAYS returns false, and yet I've verified that a[j] DOES in fact contain the string (in a[j][0]). Any idea why this is happening?

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Take it back to the basics. Try this: alert('Computer Science' in ['Computer Science']);. Nope! Also, new Array() should probably just be [] as in var a = [];. –  ErikE Jul 13 '12 at 8:44
1  
Why [1]? Anyway it is more elegant to do var a=[["computer...","computer...",...["android...]] like ErikE mentioned in the meantime –  mplungjan Jul 13 '12 at 8:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The in operator is used for testing whether a property (name) exists on an object. For example, "5" in a[j] were true - the array has an index 5.

You want to use the indexOf method to check whether an element exists in an array:

if (a[j].indexOf("Computer Science") > -1)
    //DO SOMETHING
share|improve this answer
    
Array.indexOf is not available in all browsers, notably not in IE<9. See developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/… –  KooiInc Jul 13 '12 at 8:45
    
So shame on IE, I can only say :-) Does my answer need to include the shim to be complete? –  Bergi Jul 13 '12 at 9:15
1  
the shim is in the link of my comment, so I'd say no. You could've made the point in your answer. IE unfortunately is still an unavoidable nuissance for web developers –  KooiInc Jul 13 '12 at 9:20

this works:

var a = [];
a[0] = [];
a[1] = [];

a[1][0] = "Computer Science";
a[1][1] = "Computer Engineering";
a[1][2] = "Aerospace Engineering";
a[1][3] = "Engineering (Other)";
a[1][4] = "Web Development";
a[1][5] = "Computer Programming";
a[1][6] = "Android Development";

for(j=0; j<a.length; j++) {
    if("Computer Science" in oc(a[j])) {
       alert("test");               
    }
}

function oc(a)
{
  var o = {};
  for(var i=0;i<a.length;i++)
  {
    o[a[i]]='';
  }
  return o;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/SRPEU/

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