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I have a switch case statements in c#, here all the cases i made as private constants ,is there any bad programming practice going on here, or do i need to use enumeration here and enumerator in case block.Only three constants i showed here, i have ten constants and ten case block

private const String FEASIBLESIZE = "Total FEASIBLESIZE";
private const String AVAILABLESIZE = "Total AVAILABLESIZE";
private const String EXCESSSIZE = "Total EXCESSSIZE";
                          .
                          . 
switch (value.ToString())
{
    case FEASIBLESIZE:
        Level.Add(TEAMSIZE, test.ToString());
        break;

    case AVAILABLESIZE:
        Level.Add(BROADSIZE, test.ToString());                                
        break;

    case EXCESSSIZE:
        Level.Add(NARROWSIZE, test.ToString());
        break;
         .
         .
         .
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5  
ALLCAPS makes your C# code look like something written in COBOL in the early 70s. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 13 '12 at 9:26
1  
Something smells here. Why do you convert Value to string? –  Steve Jul 13 '12 at 9:29
1  
Uppercase is often used for constants in c#, which is this case. –  Tomas Grosup Jul 13 '12 at 9:29
    
@TomasGrosup, yes, as we can see in this question this is unfortunately is still the case. But this doesn't mean that the standard C# naming conventions recommend it. Let me quote: Do not use SCREAMING_CAPS. So yeah, the fact that some people are still using this completely horrible convention doesn't mean that this is the C# standard convention. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 13 '12 at 9:39
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your constants appear to be a candidate for Enum, I would go for Enum rather than const here....

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good does it has any perfomance impacts? i think so can you explain the reason? –  vettori Jul 13 '12 at 9:52
    
Based on your const values looks like they all describe Size so they are kind of a group so better to group them in an Enum. And I suppose Enum comparison in switch case should be faster. –  Arif Eqbal Jul 13 '12 at 10:02
    
@vettori doesn't Oded's solution impress you? If my logic allowed I would go for what he suggested...You could still go for Enum the Dictionary<string,string> becomes Dictionary<yourEnum,string> –  Arif Eqbal Jul 13 '12 at 10:06
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Aside from the horrible formatting it looks roughly okay. Of course that's a bit hard to tell without actually knowing your code. Darin is correct though, in that you're not adhering to the default naming conventions (all caps is a no-go anywhere in C#).

But I have seen much worse, if that's any consolation.

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1  
+1 for I have seen much worse, if that's any consolation :-) –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 13 '12 at 9:29
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What you are doing looks like something that can be replaced using a Dictionary<string,string> mapping from one size type to another.

var sizeMap = new Dictionary<string,string>();

sizeMap.Add(FEASIBLESIZE, TEAMSIZE);
sizeMap.Add(AVAILABLESIZE, BROADSIZE);
sizeMap.Add(EXCESSSIZE, NARROWSIZE);

And instead of the switch:

Level.Add(sizeMap[value.ToString()], test.ToString());
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Please try to scope the case with curly braces this is just individual style but helps when lines of code grows up and also always use the default: too

case FEASIBLESIZE:
{
  Level.Add(TEAMSIZE, test.ToString());
  break;
}
default:
///...
break;
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Bad Programming Practice:

private const String FEASIBLESIZE = "Total FEASIBLESIZE";

Good Programming Practice:

private const String FEASIBLE_SIZE = "Total FEASIBLESIZE";

Better Programming Practice:

private const String FeasibleSize = "Total FEASIBLESIZE";
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FEASIBLE_SIZE is a definite improvement over FEASIBLESIZE but AFAIK the recommended style for c# is FeasibleSize. stackoverflow.com/questions/242534/…. –  AlanT Jul 13 '12 at 9:47
    
@AlanT: AFAIK FeasibleSize is to use with variables, and FEASIBLE_SIZE with constant. –  Nero theZero Jul 13 '12 at 9:50
    
@AlanT: thanks for the link –  Nero theZero Jul 13 '12 at 10:00
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