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I have a file that is structured in a large multidimensional structure, similar to json, but not close enough for me to use a json library.

The data looks something like this:

alpha {
    beta {
        charlie;
    }
    delta;
}

echo;
foxtrot {
    golf;
    hotel;
}

The regex I am trying to build (for a preg_match_all) should match each top level parent (delimited by {} braces) so that I can recurse through the matches, building up a multidimensional php array that represents the data.

The first regex I tried is /(?<=\{).*(?=\})/s which greedily matches content inside braces, however this isn't quite right as when there is more than one sibling in the top level the match is too greedy. Example below:

Using regex /(?<=\{).*(?=\})/s match is given as:

Match 1:

    beta {
        charlie;
    }
    delta;
}

echo;
foxtrot {
    golf;
    hotel;

Instead the result should be: Match 1:

    beta {
        charlie;
    }
    delta;

Match 2:

    golf;
    hotel;

So regex wizards, what function am I missing here or do I need to solve this with php somehow? Any tips very welcome :)

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1  
Where is this string comming from? is its creation controlled by you? if so why are you not using json? IMO this is worse then parsing HTML with regex its bound to break what happens if a value contains {or} –  Lawrence Cherone Jul 13 '12 at 9:35
    
@LawrenceCherone Yes I have control, as explained in a comment below the string is a templating markup language with a fairly strict syntax. I only mentioned json as it has a similar hierarchy-nesting style with braces, however it's function is very different. It will break if a value contains a stray brace, but this is by design. Braces are not allowed within the syntax of the language unless it is in ("") blocks. –  Zak Henry Jul 13 '12 at 10:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can't 1 do this with regular expressions.

Alternatively, if you want to match deep-to-shallow blocks, you can use \{[^\{\}]*?\} and preg_replace_callback() to store the value, and return null to erase it from the string. The callback will need to take care of nesting the value accordingly.

$heirarchalStorage = ...;
do {
    $string = \preg_replace_callback('#\{[^\{\}]*?\}#', function($block)
    use(&$heirarchalStorage) {
        // do your magic with $heirarchalStorage
        // in here
        return null;
    }, $string);
} while (!empty($string));

Incomplete, not tested, and no warranty.

This approach requires that the string be wrapped in {} as well, otherwise the final match won't happen and you'll loop forever.

This is an awful lot of (inefficient) work for something that can just as easily be solved with a well known exchange/storage format such as JSON.

1 I was going to put "you can, but...", however I'll just say once again, "You can't" 2

2 Don't

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Thanks, the deep-to-shallow approach with preg_replace is a big help. I'm already using almost identical code elsewhere in the script but for a different task. I realise the inefficiency of parsing this data, but in my example I have omitted a huge amount of extra code present in the language. It is a 'compiled' markup language that I am making, not a data transport language, so I can get away with a little parsing inefficiency. –  Zak Henry Jul 13 '12 at 10:22

Sure you can do this with regular expressions.

preg_match_all(
    '/([^\s]+)\s*{((?:[^{}]*|(?R))*)}/',
    $yourStuff,
    $matches,
    PREG_SET_ORDER
);

This gives me the following in matches:

[1]=>
string(5) "alpha"
[2]=>
string(46) "
beta {
    charlie;
}
delta;
"

and

[1]=>
string(7) "foxtrot"
[2]=>
string(22) "
golf;
hotel;
"

Breaking it down a little bit.

([^\s]+)                # non-whitespace (block name)
\s*                     # whitespace (between name and block)
{                       # literal brace
    (                   # begin capture
        (?:             # don't create another capture set
            [^{}]*      # everything not a brace
            |(?R)       # OR recurse
        )*              # none or more times
    )                   # end capture
}                       # literal brace

Just for your information, this works fine on n-deep levels of braces.

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Thanks, can you (or someone else) comment on the efficiency/readability/best practice of this technique versus the recursive PHP style @Bracketworks has given? –  Zak Henry Jul 13 '12 at 10:40
    
Well I guess there is an added complexity with the deep-to-shallow approach, in that you have to build your array backwards, you don't know how deep you are to start with, and you don't know the 'name' of the block you're processing. Not sure how much extra array fiddling you will have to do to cater for this. Also when you enter a new branch (i.e. you just finished alpha, then all of a sudden you have golf+hotel), how do you know you're in a new branch? There is no depth information given. The way his replacement works, will give you strange values in $block too, more processing required... –  Leigh Jul 13 '12 at 10:59

I think you might get something using preg_split by matching [a-zA-Z0-9][:blank]+{ and }. You'll be able to construct your array by going through the result. Use a recursive function which goes deeper when you match an opening tag, and upper on a closing tag.

Otherwise, cleanest solution would be to implement an ANTLR grammar !

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