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How can this happen?

var_dump(0=="some string"); // yields true, why?

switch(0) {
  case "a":
    echo "a"; // <-- we get here, why?
    break;  

  case "b":
    echo "b";
    break;   

  default:
    echo "def";
    break;
} 

according to this

0=="some string"
0==(int)"some string"
0==0
true

this also would logical:

        0=="some string"
(string)0=="some string"
      "0"=="some string"
       false
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by PeeHaa, tereško, Tony The Lion, j0k, kapa Jul 14 '12 at 9:40

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
use type cast switch((string) 0) and the strict comparison operators ===. See php.net/manual/en/types.comparisons.php –  Leggendario Jul 13 '12 at 9:49
1  
possible duplicate of 0 in switch case? –  tereško Jul 13 '12 at 10:16
    
possible duplicate of Odd behaviour in a switch statement –  tereško Jul 13 '12 at 10:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Too Long; Didn't Read

To sum this up in this rather long post; an implicit conversion from one type to another takes place, if you don't want this to happen use the more strict === or an explicit cast.

Examples including both can be found further down in this post..


Further reading about type-juggling can be found in the relevant section of the manual, located here.


Will the world will end, is the PHP interpreter is lying to me?

Not really, even though this might be unexpected at first glance it is actually a feature (type-juggling) of the language and it's often very usable in other situations.

When comparing objects of different types the PHP interpreter needs to find a common ground if they are of different types, naturally it will implicitly try to convert one to the other.

In this case it will try to convert the string "string" into a numeral value.

The below line is equivalent to what you have in your question:

if (0 == intval ("string"))

Hmm, wait.. erhm, what!?

Since a conversion from "string" to a numeric value isn't really possible the implicit conversion will yield 0 (as specified by the language).

It's the string which will be converted to an int since that is what the PHP committee decided upon.

This is mainly because an implicit conversion that way will aid when doing math operations.

And it's much more common to expect that behavior than the other way around.

We know that comparing 0 to 0 should compare true, and this is exactly what is happening. The below is equivalent to what you have in your question, though it's more verbose to explain things further.

function equal_ ($lhs, $rhs) {
  if (gettype ($lhs) == 'integer')
    $rhs = intval($rhs);

  /* ... */

  return $lhs === $rhs;
}

if (equal_ (0, "string")) {

}

But hey.. HEY, HOLD UP!

"When I use my switch I'm not even calling any comparison-operator, what is going on with that example?"

You don't, but the internals of the interpreter will when executing your switch-statement.

To get around this problem you will need to explicitly cast either the needle you are searching for, or the values used as labels so that they are of the same type.

Your previous snippet could be written as the below to enable more strict comparison.

switch((string)0) {
  case "a":
    echo "a";
    break;  

  case "b":
    echo "b";
    break;   

  default:
    echo "def";
    break;
} 

What if I don't want to use this "feature", what should I do?

Since PHP4 there is a more strict comparison operator; ===.

This will not allow an implicit conversion of one of the operands, instead it will first check to see if the operands are of the same type - if not; it will return false.

Only if they are of the same type will it actually compare the two, the below function is in many ways equivalent of using ===.

function strict_equal_ ($lhs, $rhs) {
  if (gettype ($lhs) != gettype ($rhs))
    return false;

  return $lhs == $rhs;
}

if (strict_equal_ (0, "string"))
  echo "True";
else
  echo "False";
share|improve this answer
    
"In this case it will try to convert the string "string" into a numeral value." - why not int to string? –  user669677 Jul 13 '12 at 10:29
    
@2astalavista read what is written under "Hmm, wait.. erhm, what!?" and you will find your answer. –  Filip Roséen - refp Jul 13 '12 at 10:30
    
"as specified by the language" - could you show where is it specified, please? –  user669677 Jul 13 '12 at 10:35
    
    
If an integer value is then assigned to $var, it becomes an integer. this is that part, right? –  user669677 Jul 13 '12 at 10:40

Its called "type juggling" and it's a language feature (from as far as I know every loosely typed language). The comparison operator expects two values of the same type. If there are not of the same type PHP tries to cast both to the most common type, which is int here. This means

0=="some string"
0==0
true
share|improve this answer
    
PHP converts strings to int before comparing those two types. You should be careful when comparing int and string. –  Arkadiusz 'flies' Rzadkowolski Jul 13 '12 at 9:44
    
why are these casted to int, not to string? –  user669677 Jul 13 '12 at 10:01
    
@2astalavista For comparison PHP always casts down. This allows to do comparisons like ""==false (what is quite useful like in if(!$inputText)), or 2 == "2 Chicken". Worth to note, that there also exists a typesafe comparison operator (usually refered as "identity comparison") === ((0=="some string")==true, but (0==="some string")==false) –  KingCrunch Jul 13 '12 at 10:04
    
@2astalavista see my post for a deeper explanation of what is going on. –  Filip Roséen - refp Jul 13 '12 at 10:19