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Okay, I implemented this SO question to my code: Return True or False Randomly

But, I have strange behavior: I need to run ten instances simultaneously, where every instance returns true or false just once per run. And surprisingly, no matter what I do, every time i get just false

Is there something to improve the method so I can have at least roughly 50% chance to get true?


To make it more understandable: I have my application builded to JAR file which is then run via batch command

 java -jar my-program.jar
 pause

Content of the program - to make it as simple as possible:

public class myProgram{

   public static boolean getRandomBoolean() {
    return Math.random() < 0.5;
    //I tried another approaches here, still the same result

     }

   public static void main(String[] args) {
   System.out.println(getRandomBoolean());  
   }

}

If I open 10 command lines and run it, I get false as result every time...

share|improve this question
12  
xkcd.com/221 –  aioobe Jul 13 '12 at 9:59
6  
Why not using Random r = new Random(); r.nextBoolean(); –  Thomas Jungblut Jul 13 '12 at 10:02

7 Answers 7

up vote 19 down vote accepted

There's nothing wrong with your code. Here's the behavior on my machine:

$ cat myProgram.java 
public class myProgram{

   public static boolean getRandomBoolean() {
       return Math.random() < 0.5;
       //I tried another approaches here, still the same result
   }

   public static void main(String[] args) {
       System.out.println(getRandomBoolean());  
   }
}

$ javac myProgram.java
$ java myProgram ; java myProgram; java myProgram; java myProgram
true
false
false
true

Needless to say, there are no guarantees for getting different values each time. In your case however, I suspect that

A) you're not working with the code you think you are, (like editing the wrong file)

B) you havn't compiled your different attempts when testing, or

C) you're working with some non-standard broken implementation.

I suggest you use Random and nextBoolean though, for clarity:

import java.util.Random;

public class myProgram{

   private static Random rnd = new Random();

   public static boolean getRandomBoolean() {
       return rnd.nextBoolean();
   }

   public static void main(String[] args) {
       System.out.println(getRandomBoolean());  
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like your answer most. Probably I am doing something wrong with the files. Or using different ones. Time to clean my project and start with clean build :) –  Pavel Janicek Jul 13 '12 at 11:36

You could also try nextBoolean()-Method

Here is an example: http://www.tutorialspoint.com/java/util/random_nextboolean.htm

share|improve this answer
1  
Their method should work, though. –  Joey Jul 13 '12 at 10:03
2  
Much more, I even tried the nextBoolean and got the same result. (10 false in row). Obviously the program is much more complicated than what I wrote, so either I am really lucky person, or really stupid programmer :) –  Pavel Janicek Jul 13 '12 at 11:31
    
@Pavel Janicek And after that 10 false in a row? or do you get allways falses? I once had the same problem with a c# project I wrote, there I did something wrong at the initialisation part. I also got allways the same results, each start. may you post your initialisation code too?! –  Sagi Jul 13 '12 at 11:51
2  
Okay there can be the catch! I did not initialise the value properly :) At least upvote for this ... ;) –  Pavel Janicek Jul 13 '12 at 11:55

Have you tried to look at sun's (oracle) documentation?

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/util/Random.html#nextBoolean()

anyway here's example code:

    java.util.Random

    Random random = new Random();
    random.nextBoolean();
share|improve this answer
    
Their method should work too, though. –  Joey Jul 13 '12 at 10:11

you could get your clock() value and check if it is odd or even. I dont know if it is %50 of true

And you can custom-create your random function:

static double  s=System.nanoTime();//in the instantiating of main applet
public static double randoom()
{

s=(double)(((555555555* s+ 444444)%100000)/(double)100000);


    return s;
}

numbers 55555.. and 444.. are the big numbers to get a wide range function please ignore that skype icon :D

share|improve this answer
    
you may not get the true cpu cycles but can get a low resolution clock cycles . then you have an error range, which you have random points every time you get a clock() value. Statistically must be %50 if error range is symmetrical –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 13 '12 at 11:12
    
He isn't asking for a double generator, so the code snippet you posted is pretty irrelevant. Secondly, checking if current time is even is not a great idea for several reasons. System.nanoTime() has no guarantee to have precision on nanosecond level. Mine only has microsecond precision. Hence, it is always even --> always true. Secondly if the random function is to be called multiple times with short time in between, the generated random value will depend on previous values. If you use currentTimeMillis() and call the random generator 100 times / ms the generator will yield 100 trues in a row. –  Alderath Jul 13 '12 at 11:13
    
if it is always true, then it doesnt have a deviation. bit=(boolean)s; if you need randomness, you will need random error range. error which is unsuspected behaviour just like random things. Thats why i have given System.nanoTime() intentionally to get error range. But you are right about the slowness of System.nanoTime() that is why it is used as a "seed". then the randoom() is used as fast as computer can –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 13 '12 at 11:33
    
My point was, altough it didn't fit within the word limit of my previous comment, that it is better to use Java's built in random functions rather than making some own ad hoc random implementation based on uninvestigated assumptions. –  Alderath Jul 13 '12 at 11:40
    
Just in case of he didnt like the libraries. Maybe his java version has some bug or damaged. I dont know. I only told what i know –  huseyin tugrul buyukisik Jul 13 '12 at 11:43

The easiest way to initialize a random number generator is to use the parameterless constructor, for example

Random generator = new Random();

However, in using this constructor you should recognize that algorithmic random number generators are not truly random, they are really algorithms that generate a fixed but random-looking sequence of numbers.

You can make it appear more 'random' by giving the Random constructor the 'seed' parameter, which you can dynamically built by for example using system time in milliseconds (which will always be different)

share|improve this answer
2  
Erm, the parameterless constructor does exactly that (mostly, at least). You rarely have to set a seed directly unless you know what you're doing. Which almost never applies for this sort of questions. And it won't make the sequence look "more random". It's simply a different sequence (bound to the seed), then. –  Joey Jul 13 '12 at 10:11

Why not use the Random class, which has a method nextBoolean:

import java.util.Random;

/** Generate 10 random booleans. */
public final class MyProgram {

  public static final void main(String... args){

    Random randomGenerator = new Random();
    for (int idx = 1; idx <= 10; ++idx){
      boolean randomBool = randomGenerator.nextBoolean();
      System.out.println("Generated : " + randomBool);
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Their method should work too, though. –  Joey Jul 13 '12 at 10:11
  • Generate an integer random number, INTEGER_RANDOM_NUMBER

  • return (INTEGER_RANDOM_NUMBER & 1)

share|improve this answer
    
This may not work with some RNGs where the low bit (& 1) alternates between 1 and 0. –  rossum Jul 13 '12 at 12:51

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