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When i perform this query:

select id as current from events where date = '{$result['date']}'
union all
(select id as previous from events where date < '{$result['date']}' order by date desc limit 1)
union all
(select id as next from events where date > '{$result['date']}' order by date asc limit 1)

it selects the ID where the date is $result['date], the date below that, and the date above that.

So in my php code i need an array like so:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
    (
        [current] => 6
    )

    [1] => Array
    (
        [previous] => 5
    )

    [2] => Array
    (
        [next] => 7
    )

)

however, the array comes out like:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
    (
        [current] => 6
    )

    [1] => Array
    (
        [current] => 5
    )

    [2] => Array
    (
        [current] => 7
    )

)

I need the assoc array to depict the right keys!

Even though in my SQL i do

select id as current select id as previous select id as next

they all come out as current???

any ideas?

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Another approach is to include a literal string in the select list of each query (e.g. 'current','previous','next') and to return that as part of the resultset. This doesn't match the result you wanted, but it does give you a resultset you can work with. This avoids the overhead of three separate queries, and avoids issues with "missing" rows when a JOIN is used. (See my answer.) –  spencer7593 Jul 13 '12 at 15:44
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The reason why the column is the same name is because when you UNION two or more queries, the name of the column(s) in the topmost query are always the names displayed in the final result, regardless of the column names in subsequent queries (they are essentially ignored).

MySQL Union Syntax

"The column names from the first SELECT statement are used as the column names for the results returned."


Instead, why not get the id's in separate columns in one query?

SELECT a.id AS current, prev.id AS previous, next.id AS next
FROM events a
CROSS JOIN 
(
    SELECT id FROM events 
    WHERE date < '{$result['date']}' 
    ORDER BY date DESC 
    LIMIT 1
) prev
CROSS JOIN 
(
    SELECT id
    FROM events 
    WHERE date > '{$result['date']}' 
    ORDER BY date 
    LIMIT 1
) next
WHERE a.date = '{$result['date']}'

Which would give you something like:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
    (
        [current] => 6
        [previous] => 5
        [next] => 7
    )
)
share|improve this answer
    
AHH, theres a problem with this query! if there is NO date lower or higher, NO result set is returned! is there anyway to fix this? If the date is at its lowest possible date, it must still return the next date. and vice versa! –  AlexMorley-Finch Jul 13 '12 at 10:50
    
Do you have any ideas on my previous comment? I appreciate your help –  AlexMorley-Finch Jul 13 '12 at 11:00
    
You can use a left outer join. Or three separate queries :-) –  mavroprovato Jul 13 '12 at 11:25
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Unions do not work that way. They return a set of ids and the column name is the same for all.

In your specific situation, it will be clearer to run 3 separate queries.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you speak the truth sir... Cheers anyway! –  AlexMorley-Finch Jul 13 '12 at 10:12
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As other answers pointed out, it's not possible to get that result.

When I've needed something like what you show, I will include a literal as an identifier that shows which query returned the value:

select 'current' as source, id from events where date = '{$result['date']}'
union all
(select 'previous', id from events 
  where date < '{$result['date']}' order by date desc limit 1)
union all
(select 'next', id from events 
  where date > '{$result['date']}' order by date asc limit 1)

The result set returned does not match your specification, but this approach does return a result that I can work with.

This approach avoids the (unnecessary) overhead of three separate queries (statement parses, statement executions, statement fetches) roundtrips against the database.

This will give you a structure something like this, which you could convert to your desired structure:

Array
(
  [0] => Array
  (
     ["source"] => "current"
     ["id"]     => 6
  )
  [1] => Array
  (
     ["source"] => "previous"
     ["id"]     => 5
  )
  [2] => Array
  (
     ["source"] => "next"
     ["id"]     => 7
  )
)
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