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I am just designing a web service at the moment so I have no actual code but this potentially affects both the database and application design.

I plan on having a database table (in SQL Server) which will have a primary key of type bigint which is auto increment. Now I'm assuming in ADO.NET I won't be setting this field when adding new records to the table. What I need to know is how will I know what the ID was that was just added. Of course I could then do a select MAX on that field but does ADO.NET actually return the value of the new ID saving me the overhead?

For example, if I had some code like this:

using (MyEntities context = new MyEntities())
{
    context.Table1.AddObject(new Table1()
    {
        StringColumn1 = "some value",
        StringColumn2 = "some value"
    });

    context.SaveChanges();
}

If there was a auto increment PK in Table1 called ID, how do I know the value that was just added?

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1  
Is this using Entity Framework? If so: EF should take care of automagically updating those ID's for you when you do an insert. If you're using raw ADO.NET - look into either using the OUTPUT clause of your INSERT statement, or look at SCOPE_IDENTITY() to be called just after the INSERT (in the same SQL batch) –  marc_s Jul 13 '12 at 10:30
    
Yes I'm using EF. @marc_s - I know it will do that. That wasn't the question. How do I know what that value is? –  Jonnster Jul 13 '12 at 10:31
1  
You need to keep a reference to your object that you're about to insert, then then after the call to .SaveChanges(), you can read out the ID property from that object. –  marc_s Jul 13 '12 at 10:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If remember correctly I achieved it this way because EF with get the Id for you

using (MyEntities context = new MyEntities())
{
var table1 =  new Table1()
{
      StringColumn1 = "some value",
      StringColumn2 = "some value"
};

    context.Table1.AddObject(table1);

    context.SaveChanges();

int id = table1.Id;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. So the EF will actually fill in the Id for me. –  Jonnster Jul 13 '12 at 10:43
    
@Jonnster Yes it will sorry have typed quickly so can get back to work –  HatSoft Jul 13 '12 at 10:49

Using Entity Framework, this is all done automagically for you:

using (MyEntities context = new MyEntities())
{
    var myNewObject = new Table1()
    {
        StringColumn1 = "some value",
        StringColumn2 = "some value"
    });

    context.Table1.AddObject(myNewObject);

    context.SaveChanges();

    // get the new ID
    var newID = myNewObject.ID;
}

Saving in Entity Framework will automatically update the "auto-increment" ID column, and you just read it out after the call to .SaveChanges() ...

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1  
if you are creating the model yourself (rather than generating it from a database) I think you might also need to set StoreGeneratedPattern to Identity –  paul Jul 13 '12 at 10:40

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