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I started trying out the boost graph classes. For this i created a simple sample as seen below. When traversing the graph through the depth-first-search algorithm, a node, which i didn't add. Here is the code:

#include <boost\graph\adjacency_list.hpp>
#include <boost\graph\depth_first_search.hpp>
#include <iostream>

typedef boost::adjacency_list<boost::listS, boost::vecS, boost::undirectedS> GraphType;
typedef boost::graph_traits<GraphType>::vertex_descriptor VertexType;

class VertexVisitor : public boost::default_dfs_visitor
{
public:
  void discover_vertex(VertexType v, GraphType g)
  {
    std::cout << v << std::endl;
  }
};

int main() 
{ 
  GraphType g;
  boost::add_edge(1,2,g);
  boost::add_edge(1,3,g);
  boost::add_edge(2,3,g);
  boost::add_edge(1,4,g);
  boost::add_edge(4,5,g);

  VertexVisitor vis;
  boost::depth_first_search(g, boost::visitor(vis));

  return 0;
}

The output of this is

0
1
2
3
4
5

But where is the 0 coming from, i never added it? Is this some kind of dummy node? But if so, why is it visited on traversal and how can i achieve the desired behaviour?

EDIT 1: After trying, what PlasmaHH suggested, and debugging through the boost code i found, that boost::add_edge invokes a resize of the vertex structure of the graph. Thus more elements are added and visited by the search algorithm, although they are not connected to each other. Btw.: I'm using boost 1.47.

EDIT 2: It has shown, that the depth_first_search behaves (except of it's native difference) different from the breadth_first_search-algorithm, since the DFS traverses all nodes in the graph, even if they are not connected. I can't see the benefit of that, becauses i just want to find a path from one node to another one, that is connected to this one, but ok. As said before, the solution for my problem was the use of the BFS algorithm, which does not traverse through all subgraphs. For those who are interested, i add a litte example:

#include <boost\graph\adjacency_list.hpp>
#include <boost\graph\depth_first_search.hpp>
#include <boost\graph\breadth_first_search.hpp>
#include <iostream>

typedef boost::adjacency_list<boost::listS, boost::vecS, boost::undirectedS>  GraphType;
typedef boost::graph_traits<GraphType>::vertex_descriptor VertexType;

class DFSVertexVisitor : public boost::default_dfs_visitor
{
public:
  void discover_vertex(GraphType::vertex_descriptor v, GraphType g)
  {
    std::cout << v << std::endl;
  }
};

class BFSVertexVisitor : public boost::default_bfs_visitor
{
public:
  void discover_vertex(GraphType::vertex_descriptor v, GraphType g)
  {
    std::cout << v << std::endl;
  }
};


int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
  GraphType g;
  boost::add_edge(1, 2, g);
  boost::add_edge(2, 3, g);
  boost::add_edge(1, 3, g);
  boost::add_edge(4, 5, g);

  std::cout << "Performing BFS" << std::endl;
  BFSVertexVisitor bfsVisitor;
  boost::breadth_first_search(g, boost::vertex(1, g), boost::visitor(bfsVisitor));

  std::cout << "Performing DFS" << std::endl;
  DFSVertexVisitor dfsVisitor;
  boost::depth_first_search(g, boost::visitor(dfsVisitor).root_vertex(1));

  return 0;
}

Note, that nodes 4 and 5 are not connected to nodes 1, 2 and 3!

Output:

Performing BFS
1
2
3
Performing DFS
1
2
3
0
4
5

EDIT 3: I had to re-think again. The numbers i connected with add_edge aren't the nodes itself but only their indices as n.m just suggested. So just adding edges is not the final solution i think, since removing one of the vertices does not work as expected.

share|improve this question
    
I have no experience with boost graph, but I noticed that when trying this testcase (congratulations to creating one btw!) it is not necessary to add more than the first edge to get one 0 node. But when adding an edge at 0,1 there is only 0,1. So I tried to add only one at 8,9 and I have from 0 to 9. Maybe that helps somehow. –  PlasmaHH Jul 13 '12 at 11:14
    
Thats indeed very strange, but thanks for the hint. I'll do some more investigations on that. –  AquilaRapax Jul 13 '12 at 12:29

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

From the documentation:

If the VertexList of the graph is vecS, then the graph has a builtin vertex indices accessed via the property map for the vertex_index_t property. The indices fall in the range [0, num_vertices(g)) and are contiguous. When a vertex is removed the indices are adjusted so that they retain these properties.

I don't think the documentation says explicitly that vertex_descriptor is just the index. Some of the examples in the documentation suggest that this is indeed the case. Other examples treat vertex_descriptor as a black box.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you're right. The underlying structures are very flexible and can be used as only wrapper but also as containers. I solved my problem by just using the bfs instead of the dfs, since it behaves different from dfs, which traverses through all nodes in the graph, even if they are not connected. –  AquilaRapax Jul 16 '12 at 7:01
    
Ok, i had to rethink again. You were right. The numbers i connected, are not the "actual" nodes, but the indices of those nodes. –  AquilaRapax Jul 16 '12 at 7:54

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