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Given this code :

#include <stdio.h>
#include <assert.h>

void print_number(int* somePtr) {
  assert (somePtr!=NULL);
  printf ("%d\n",*somePtr);
}

int main ()
{
  int a=1234;
  int * b = NULL;
  int * c = NULL;

  b=&a;

  print_number (c);
  print_number (b);

  return 0;
}

I can do this instead :

#include <stdio.h>
#include <assert.h>

void print_number(int* somePtr) {
  if (somePtr != NULL)
       printf ("%d\n",*somePtr);
  // else do something 
}

int main ()
{
  int a=1234;
  int * b = NULL;
  int * c = NULL;

  b=&a;

  print_number (c);
  print_number (b);

  return 0;
}

So , what am I gaining by using assert ?

Regards

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1  
Perhaps you should have tagged C instead of C++. C headers only, C functions only. –  Alexandre P. Levasseur Jul 13 '12 at 11:08
    
@AlexandreP.Levasseur: in C it would have been int main(void) ;) –  PlasmaHH Jul 13 '12 at 11:11
    
I guess I missed that :D It was more of a slight hint to OP that if he is going to use C++ he might as well make use of its headers and features. –  Alexandre P. Levasseur Jul 13 '12 at 11:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

assert is to document your assumptions in the code. if statement is to handle different logical scenarios.

Now in your specific case, think from the point of view of the developer of the print_number() function.

For example when you write

void print_number(int* somePtr) {
  assert (somePtr!=NULL);
  printf ("%d\n",*somePtr);
}

you mean to say that,

In my print_number function I assume that always the pointer coming is not null. I would be very very surprised if this is null. I don't care to handle this scenario at all in my code.

But, if you write

void print_number(int* somePtr) {
  if (somePtr != NULL)
       printf ("%d\n",*somePtr);
  // else do something 
}

You seem to say that, in my print_number function, I expect people to pass a null pointer. And I know how to handle this situation and I do handle this with an else condition.

So, sometimes you will know how to handle certain situations and you want to do that. Then, use if. Sometimes, you assume that something will not happen and you don't care to handle it. You just express your surprise and stop your program execution there with assert.

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The difference is that std::assert is enabled only for debug build; it is not enabled for release build (i.e when NDEBUG is defined), which means in the release build there will be no check; as a result, your code will be little bit faster, compared to the one in which you use if condition which remains in the release build as well.

That means, std::assert is used to check common errors when you write the code, and catch them as soon as possible, in the development phase itself.

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Lots of reasons:

  1. Asserts are usually removed for release builds.
  2. Asserts will report failure information to the client. if() does nothing by itself.
  3. Because asserts are usually macros, you can also get code information about the failing assertion.
  4. Assert is more semantically clear than if().
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Assert will inform you that something wrong happend, possibly error to be fixed. In debug mode it will break and show callstack that will help you with fixing bug. So its a good practice to use. I would actually use if() and assert, because in Release your asserts should be turned off:

void print_number(int* somePtr) {
  assert(somePtr != NULL);
  if (somePtr != NULL)
       printf ("%d\n",*somePtr);
  // else do something 
}

in " // else do something " you might think of throwing exception or returning error code.

share|improve this answer

If assertion fails, you will see the output containing the failed assertion itself, plus the function and the line of the failed assert, something like:

test: main.cpp:9: int main(): Assertion `0==1' failed.

So, if your program crashes in runtime, you will see the exact reason and location of the crash. There's a big article about assertions in wiki.

share|improve this answer
    
not to mention, less typing to achieve the same result. –  Chris Gessler Jul 13 '12 at 10:46

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