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Possible Duplicate:
Java question about autoboxing and object equality / identity

Integer i1 = 10;
Integer i2 = 10;
Integer i3 = 210;
Integer i4 = 210;

if(i1 ==i2){
      System.out.println("True");
}else{
      System.out.println("False");
}
if(i3==i4){
       System.out.println("True");
}else{
       System.out.println("False");
}
if(Integer.valueOf(10) ==Integer.valueOf(10)){
       System.out.println("True");
}else{
      System.out.println("False");
}
if(Integer.valueOf(210) ==Integer.valueOf(210)){
       System.out.println("True");
}else{
       System.out.println("False");
}

The answer is

True

False

True

False

Why it is giving false for 2 and 4 condition ?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Joachim Sauer, AVD, hvgotcodes, JB Nizet, Petar Minchev Jul 13 '12 at 11:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
You can see the solution here: stackoverflow.com/questions/10223555/… – Averroes Jul 13 '12 at 11:49
1  
Actually stackoverflow.com/questions/5117132/… is probably the better close target. – Joachim Sauer Jul 13 '12 at 11:50
    
Its an Object, but not as we know it – MadProgrammer Jul 13 '12 at 12:24
    
In JDK1.5 there is a new concept called Caching Integer Objects. In JDK1.5 the JVM caches Integer objects from range of -128 to 127 . So every time an integer object is create with value between the above mentioned range same object will be returned instead of creating the new object. – Rahul Agrawal Jul 13 '12 at 12:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Note that Integer is an object, not a primitive. You're comparing different object instances.

For this particular example, it's worth reading about boxing.

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Use .equals() to compares Integer.== compares refrences equality

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== compares instances not values. Use int instead of Integer and it will work

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In Java use the Object function Object.equals(Object) to compare objects. That comparison would only work correctly using the primitive int.

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nice +1 really good answer! – GingerHead Jul 13 '12 at 11:53

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