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I'm trying to set up a script where an alert is generated when a certain string appears in a log file.

The solution already in place greps the whole log file once a minute and counts how often the string appears, using the log line's timestamp to count only occurrences in the previous minute.

I figured it would be much more efficient to do this with a tail, so I tried the following, as a test:

FILENAME="/var/log/file.log"

tail -f $FILENAME | awk -F , -v var="$HOSTNAME" '
                BEGIN {
                        failed_count=0;
                }
                /account failure reason/ {
                        failed_count++;
                }
                END {
                        printf("%saccount failure reason (Errors per Interval)=%d\n", var, failed_count);
                }
'

but this just hangs and doesn't output anything. Somebody suggested this minor change:

FILENAME="/var/log/file.log"

awk -F , -v var="$HOSTNAME" '
                BEGIN {
                        failed_count=0;
                }
                /account failure reason/ {
                        failed_count++;
                }
                END {
                        printf("%saccount failure reason (Errors per Interval)=%d\n", var, failed_count);
                }
' <(tail -f $FILENAME)

but that does the same thing.

The awk I'm using (I've simplified in the code above) works, as it's used in the existing script where the results of grep "^$TIMESTAMP" are piped into it.

My question is, how can get the tail -f to work with awk?

share|improve this question
4  
When you tail -f, your awk script never comes to an END. So you keep counting errors, but never printf anything. You need another condition (for example, detecting that it's a new day) that runs your printf and resets the counter. Show us a sample of your log, and we can suggest a fix. –  ghoti Jul 13 '12 at 11:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Assuming your log looks something like this:

Jul 13 06:43:18 foo account failure reason: unknown
 │   │    
 │   └── $2 in awk
 └────── $1 in awk

you could do something like this:

FILENAME="/var/log/file.log"

tail -F $FILENAME | awk -v hostname="$HOSTNAME" '
    NR == 1 {
        last=$1 " " $2;
    }
    $1 " " $2 != last {
        printf("%s account failure reason (Errors on %s)=%d\n", hostname, last, failed);
        last=$1 " " $2;
        failed=0;
    }
    /account failure reason/ {
        failed++;
    }
'

Note that I've changed this to tail -F (capital F) because it handles log aging. This isn't supported in every operating system, but it should work in modern BSDs and Linuces.

How does this work?

Awk scripts consist of sets of test { commands; } evaluated against each line of input. (There are two special tests, BEGIN and END whose commands run when awk starts and when awk ends, respectively. In your question, awk never ended, so the END code was never run.)

The script above has three of test/command sections:

  • In the first, NR == 1 is a test that evaluates true on only the first line of input. The command it runs creates the initial value for the last variable, used in the next section.
  • In the second section, we test whether the "last" variable has changed since the last line that was evaluated. If this is true, it indicates that we're evaluating a new day's data. Now it's time to print a summary (log) of last month, reset our variables and move on.
  • In the third, if the line we're evaluating matches the regular expression /account failure reason/, we increment our counter.

Clear as mud? :-)

share|improve this answer
    
+1 - In order to do errors/day, you need to keep a count of the days and do the division. Or you can change your wording to "Errors yesterday" and reset failed_count. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 13 '12 at 12:38
    
Ooh, spot on! No idea what it's doing, but nice one, thanks! –  mazz0 Jul 13 '12 at 13:29
    
@DennisWilliamson - right, thanks for pointing that out. I've updated the answer so the code will provide clearer results. –  ghoti Jul 13 '12 at 20:04
    
Hey, re-reading this 2 years later I actually understand it now, grand :) Might have a look through some more answers to my old questions. Thanks again! –  mazz0 Jun 20 '14 at 14:14

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