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Saw this post yesterday: How I instantiate this generic? Include code

The user could not get the constructor type of a generic class, X to match the type of the object passed into the constructor, IA, even though <X extends IA>.

I didnt really like the only answer provided, as it made the whole point of generics useless if you have to change the M constructor type from X to IA<X>. Surely this is why the generic type for M is <X extends IA>??

Is there really no way to use generics (without any suppressed warnings) for this basic example?

public interface IA<X extends IA<X>>{}

public class A<X extends IA<X>> implements IA<X>{}

public class W<X extends IA<X>>{}

public class M<X extends IA<X>> extends W<X>{
    X anx;

    public M(X x){} //Type X here is not compatibile with IA in the test code
}


//Testing code in a different class
public <X extends IA<X>> void check() {

    IA<X> a = new A<X>();
    W<X> s = new M<X>(a); //Doesn't compile because IA<X> is not the same as 'X', even though <X extends IA> 
    W<X> s = new M(a);    //Compiles, but with suppressed warnings

    X a = new A<X>();  //Doesnt compiler (ignoring dupicate 'a' variable)  
    W<X> s = new M<X>(a); compiles
}

edited to include IA everywhere including 'extends'

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public interface IA<X extends IA>{} <= what does that mean for you? Is this just a compile game is there any real usage behind? –  nomoa Jul 13 '12 at 12:53
    
I'm pretty sure at a minimum you should be using IA<X> everywhere you're using IA. –  Louis Wasserman Jul 13 '12 at 12:55
    
I took it from the post I saw- but I presume they had this as an interface from someone else and just didnt include every interface method. –  mezamorphic Jul 13 '12 at 12:56
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have to do something like this:

//Testing code in a different class
public <X extends IA<X>> void check() {
    IA<X> a = new A<X>();
    W<subtypeofIA(IA works as well)> s = new M<subtypeofIA(IA works as well)>(a); //Doesn't compile because IA<X> is not the same as 'X', even though <X extends IA> 
    W<X> s = new M(a);    //Compiles, but with suppressed warnings 
}

Regarding the warnings, I think they are self-explanatory and they can be summarized as: When you have a generically parameterized type whenever you wan to use it, you have to instantiate the generic parameter to a concrete type. Generic parameters have been introduced in order to generalize code but also to enforce type safeness. Using IA means you throw away the type safety you could've gotten by saying : IA < ASpecificType > and the compiler draws your attention on this.

The following code is the closest I could get to your code and at the same time to make some sense:

interface IA<X extends IA<X>>{}

class A<X extends IA<X>> implements IA<X>{}

class W<X extends IA<X>>{}

class M<X extends IA<X>> extends W<X>{
    X anx;

    public M(X x){} //Type X here is not compatibile with IA in the test code 
}


//Testing code in a different class
public <X extends IA<X>> void check() {

    IA<X> a = new A<X>();
    W<X> s = new M<X>(null); //Doesn't compile because IA<X> is not the same as 'X', even though <X extends IA> 
    W<X> ss = new M(a);    //Compiles, but with suppressed warnings

    X aa = new A<X>();  //this is completely illegal  
    W<X> sss = new M<X>(aa); //compiles
}
share|improve this answer
    
do you mean W<new A()> s = new M<new A()>(a)? –  mezamorphic Jul 13 '12 at 13:00
    
No, I mean for instance : W<IA> s = new M<IA>(a) or: W<NicerIA> s = new M<NicerIA>(a) where NicerIA is defined as class/interface NicerIA implements/extends IA –  Razvan Jul 13 '12 at 13:01
    
Class A implements IA.... W<IA> s = new M<A>(a) and W<A> s = new M<A>(a) dont compile... –  mezamorphic Jul 13 '12 at 13:03
1  
because a is not of type A. And as you defined the constructor of M, it expects it to be of type A. For instance this is going to work for sure: W<IA> s = new M<A>(new A()); –  Razvan Jul 13 '12 at 13:06
    
The constructor of M says <X extends IA> so it should work with A or IA? –  mezamorphic Jul 13 '12 at 13:08
show 4 more comments

The question involves a lot of generic constraints that don't make sense. M<X>'s constructor takes an argument of type X, which is a type parameter of the generic method check (that means the caller can decide X to be anything and this needs to still work). So why do you expect a (or anything else for that matter) to be the right type?

If you want to ask how to change generics constraints so that it works, here is a much simpler thing (it just changes generics (but keeps W and M as they are) and nothing else from the original) that compiles, and is probably closer to what you wanted anyway:

public interface IA<X>{}

public class A implements IA<A>{}

public class W<X extends IA<X>>{}

public class M<X extends IA<X>> extends W<X>{
    X anx;

    public M(X x){}
}


public void check() {

    A a = new A();
    W<A> s = new M<A>(a);
}
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The problem is that a, which is getting passed into the constructor is of type IA. The constructor for M requires X. IA cannot be cast to X so this is a syntax error.

The second option does compile but if you were to actually run it you would be assigning amx to a variable that is not really an instance of X (hence the reason you get warnings saying this is a bad idea).

If you change the constructor to take in IA then everything works out ok.

share|improve this answer
    
but if the constructor of IA is changed, you (I presume with the original poster) remove the need to use generics? If I declare a as X it still doesnt work.. –  mezamorphic Jul 13 '12 at 13:09
    
@fast_code: but what is the need to use generics in this case? –  newacct Jul 13 '12 at 19:39
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