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Hi Just like we do with __ToString, is there a way to define a method for casting?

$obj = (MyClass) $another_class_obj;
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4  
Why would you ever want to cast anything in PHP? You can just call whatever methods you want anyway. –  n3rd Jul 18 '09 at 11:14
4  
You can't call those methods if they don't exist in the class -- you may need to typecast one user class to another in order to call the functions directly using the -> operator –  Josh Jul 18 '09 at 15:47
    
Josh, in that case, there must be something wrong in the application flow. –  Ionuț G. Stan Jul 18 '09 at 19:25
    
I feel your judgement may be hasty; however I would agree that gnarf's solution for creating a new object is better as it allows logic for converting between classes. –  Josh Jul 18 '09 at 20:59

6 Answers 6

up vote 64 down vote accepted

There is no need to type cast in php.


Edit: Since this topic seems to cause some confusion, I thought I'd elaborate a little.

In languages such as Java, there are two things that may carry type. The compiler has a notion about type, and the run time has another idea about types. The compilers types are tied to variables, whereas the run time engine tracks the type of values (Which are assigned to variables). The variable types are known at compile time, whereas the value types are only known at run time.

If a piece of input code violates the compilers type system, the compiler will barf and halt compilation. In other words, it's impossible to compile a piece of code that violates the static type system. This catches a certain class of errors. For example, take the following piece of (simplified) Java code:

class Alpha {}

class Beta extends Alpha {
  public void sayHello() {
    System.out.println("Hello");
  }
}

If we now did this:

Alpha a = new Beta();

we would be fine, since Beta is a subclass of Alpha, and therefore a valid value for the variable a of type Alpha. However, if we proceed to do:

a.sayHello();

The compiler would give an error, since the method sayHello isn't a valid method for Alpha - Regardless that we know that a is actually a Beta.

Enter type casting:

((Beta) a).sayHello();

Here we tell the compiler that the variable a should - in this case - be treated as a Beta. This is known as type casting. This loophole is very useful, because it allows polymorphism in the language, but obviously it is also a back door for all sorts of violations of the type system. In order to maintain some type safety, there are therefore some restrictions; You can only cast to types that are related. Eg. up or down a hierarchy. In other words, you wouldn't be able to cast to a completely unrelated class Charlie.

It's important to note that all this happens in the compiler - That is, it happens before the code even runs. Java can still get in to run time type errors. For example, if you did this:

class Alpha {}

class Beta extends Alpha {
  public void sayHello() {
    System.out.println("Hello");
  }
}

class Charlie extends Alpha {}

Alpha a = new Charlie();
((Beta) a).sayHello();

The above code is valid for the compiler, but at run time, you'll get an exception, since the cast from Beta to Charlie is incompatible.

Meanwhile, back at the PHP-farm.

The following is valid to the PHP-compiler - It'll happily turn this into executable byte code, but you'll get a run time error:

class Alpha {}

class Beta extends Alpha {
  function sayHello() {
    print "Hello";
  }
}
$a = new Alpha();
$a->sayHello();

This is because PHP variables don't have type. The compiler has no idea about what run time types are valid for a variable, so it doesn't try to enforce it. You don't specify the type explicitly as in Java either. There are type hints, yes, but these are simply run time contracts. The following is still valid:

// reuse the classes from above
function tellToSayHello(Alpha $a) {
  $a->sayHello();
}
tellToSayHello(new Beta());

Even though PHP variables don't have types, the values still do. A particular interesting aspect of PHP, is that it is possible to change the type of a value. For example:

// The variable $foo holds a value with the type of string
$foo = "42";
echo gettype($foo); // Yields "string"
// Here we change the type from string -> integer
settype($foo, "integer");
echo gettype($foo); // Yields "integer"

This feature some times confused with type casting, but that is a misnomer. The type is still a property of the value, and the type-change happens in runtime - not at compile time.

The ability to change type is also quite limited in PHP. It is only possible to change type between simple types - not objects. Thus, it isn't possible to change the type from one class to another. You can create a new object and copy the state, but changing the type isn't possible. PHP is a bit of an outsider in this respect; Other similar languages treat classes as a much more dynamic concept than PHP does.

Another similar feature of PHP is that you can clone a value as a new type, like this:

// The variable $foo holds a value with the type of string
$foo = "42";
echo gettype($foo); // Yields "string"
// Here we change the type from string -> integer
$bar = (integer) $foo;
echo gettype($bar); // Yields "integer"

Syntactically this looks a lot like how a typecast is written in statically typed languages. It's therefore also often confused with type casting, even though it is still a runtime type-conversion.

To summarise: Type casting is an operation that changes the type of a variable (not the value). Since variables are without type in PHP, it is not only impossible to do, but a nonsensical thing to ask in the first place.

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1  
Well then, don't keep it to yourself. –  VolkerK Jul 18 '09 at 12:24
1  
Variables in PHP are untyped; Only the objects they refer to have types. As such you can't typecast a variable in php. –  troelskn Jul 18 '09 at 17:35
2  
That would seem to contradict the PHP manual –  Josh Jul 18 '09 at 20:57
2  
This is an excellent answer. I feel you could improve it by mentioning that in PHP values have types. This is interesting because the value could have its type changed - an Alpha object could be told "become a Beta object". Python and Javascript support this for example (in Python by changing its __class__ field). However, PHP does not, and has a static class hierarchy. So while it would make sense to allow a PHP value to change its type, it is just not allowed in the language. –  Paul Biggar Sep 26 '09 at 13:14
1  
troelskn, I agree, this is an excellent answer and very clearly explains typecasting and the lack of it in PHP. –  Josh Sep 29 '09 at 12:12

Although there's no need to type cast in PHP, you might come across a situation where you would like to convert a parent object into a child object.

Simple

//Example of a sub class
class YourObject extends MyObject {
    public function __construct(MyObject $object) {
        foreach($object as $property => $value) {
            $this->$property = $value;
        }
    }
}


$my_object = new MyObject();
$your_object = new YourObject($my_object);

So all you do is pass the parent object down to the child object's constructor, and let the constructor copy over the properties. You can even filter / change them as needed.

Advanced

//Class to return standard objects
class Factory {
    public static function getObject() {
        $object = new MyObject();
        return $object;
    }
}

//Class to return different object depending on the type property
class SubFactory extends Factory {
    public static function getObject() {
        $object = parent::getObject();
        switch($object->type) {
        case 'yours':
            $object = new YourObject($object);
            break;
        case 'ours':
            $object = new OurObject($object);
            break;
        }
        return $object;
    }
}

//Example of a sub class
class YourObject extends MyObject {
    public function __construct(MyObject $object) {
        foreach($object as $property => $value) {
            $this->$property = $value;
        }
    }
}

It's not type casting, but it does what you need.

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I think you need to type cast in order to make a better IDE. But php the language itself doesn't need type casting it does however support runtime type changes to the values in the variables. Take a look at autoboxing and unboxing. That's what php inherently does. So sorry no better than already are IDEs.

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I reworked the function Josh posted (which will error because of the undefined $new_class variable). Here's what I got:

function changeClass(&$obj, $newClass)
{	$obj = unserialize(preg_replace	// change object into type $new_class
	(	"/^O:[0-9]+:\"[^\"]+\":/i", 
		"O:".strlen($newClass).":\"".$newClass."\":", 
		serialize($obj)
	));
}

function classCast_callMethod(&$obj, $newClass, $methodName, $methodArgs=array())
{	$oldClass = get_class($obj);
	changeClass($obj, $newClass);

	// get result of method call
	$result = call_user_func_array(array($obj, $methodName), $methodArgs);
	changeClass(&$obj, $oldClass);	// change back
	return $result;
}

It works just like you'd expect a class cast to work. You could build something similar for accessing class members - but I don't think I would ever need that, so i'll leave it to someone else.

Boo to all the jerks that say "php doesn't cast" or "you don't need to cast in php". Bullhockey. Casting is an important part of object oriented life, and I wish I could find a better way to do it than ugly serialization hacks.

So thank you Josh!

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Just a note, I would add a thrown exception into changeClass if the class casted to is not a parent class. This would include classes that don't exist. But the code i have above is pretty much the simplest you can get for a working cast that I know of. –  B T Aug 19 '09 at 1:37
    
The only thing I would use the casting for in php, is to let the IDE know the type of the object.. so the IDE can autocomplete the properties of a class instance.. That's all. –  Janov Byrnisson Aug 4 '10 at 8:56
    
Well thats all well and good for you Janov, but if you're building a complex interface that isn't incredibly verbose, you sometimes need a little trickery. I had to use class casting for a database abstraction layer I created. Otherwise there would have been no way to adequately handle subclassing. –  B T Aug 5 '10 at 0:36
1  
php doesnt cast means php have no native method to cast. Serialization deserialization a method to over come the issue. –  nerkn Dec 19 '10 at 14:32

Here's a function to change the class of an object:

/**
 * Change the class of an object
 *
 * @param object $obj
 * @param string $class_type
 * @author toma at smartsemantics dot com
 * @see http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.types.type-juggling.php#50791
 */
function changeClass(&$obj,$new_class)
{
    if(class_exists($class_type,true))
    {
    	$obj = unserialize(preg_replace("/^O:[0-9]+:\"[^\"]+\":/i",
    		"O:".strlen($class_type).":\"".$new_class."\":", serialize($obj)));
    }
}

In case it's not clear, this is not my function, it was taken from a post by "toma at smartsemantics dot com" on http://www.php.net/manual/en/language.types.type-juggling.php#50791

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Why the downvote? –  Josh Jul 18 '09 at 12:41
2  
That is not a typecast. That is changing the type of the object - not the variable. In PHP, you can't typecast, since variables don't have types. –  troelskn Jul 18 '09 at 17:33
2  
I agree, my function changes the class of the object. WHich is what the question's author intended. And according to the PHP manual, variables do have types and typecasting is possible: us.php.net/manual/en/… –  Josh Jul 18 '09 at 20:56
    
Fair enough; You can change the type of a primitive. But you can't change the type of an object. Regardless of the wording in the manual, variables do not have type in php. They refer to values which have type. –  troelskn Jul 18 '09 at 21:59
    
I see your point -- I'll edit my post to make it clear tha it changes the class of an object. –  Josh Jul 18 '09 at 22:59

I do not believe there is a overloading operator in PHP to handle that, however:

<?php

class MyClass {

  protected $_number;

  static public function castFrom($obj) {
    $new = new self();
    if (is_int($obj)) {
      $new->_number = $obj;
    } else if ($obj instanceOf MyNumberClass){
      /// some other type of casting
    }
    return $new;
  }
}

$test = MyClass::castFrom(123123);
var_dump($test);

Is one way to handle it.

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