Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've got an Android app developed, and I'm at the point of a phone app development where everything seems to be working well and you want to declare victory and ship, but you know there just have to be some memory and resource leaks in there; and there's only 16mb of heap on the Android and its apparently surprisingly easy to leak in an Android app.

I've been looking around and so far have only been able to dig up info on 'hprof' and 'traceview' and neither gets a lot of favorable reviews.

What tools or methods have you come across or developed and care to share maybe in an OS project?

share|improve this question

closed as off-topic by Łukasz 웃 L ツ, hichris123, Bill the Lizard Feb 15 at 4:01

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking us to recommend or find a tool, library or favorite off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it." – Łukasz 웃 L ツ, Bill the Lizard
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

add comment

7 Answers

One of the most common errors that I found developing Android Apps is the “java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Bitmap Size Exceeds VM Budget” error. I found this error frecuently on activities using lots of bitmaps after changing orientation: the Activity is destroyed, created again and the layouts are “inflated” from the XML consuming the VM memory avaiable for bitmaps.

Bitmaps on the previous activity layout are not properly deallocated by the garbage collector because they have crossed references to their activity. After many experiments I found a quite good solution for this problem.

First, set the “id” attribute on the parent view of your XML layout:

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
    <RelativeLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
     android:layout_width="fill_parent"
     android:layout_height="fill_parent"
     android:id="@+id/RootView"
     >
     ...

Then, on the onDestroy() method of your Activity, call the unbindDrawables() method passing a refence to the parent View and then do a System.gc()

    @Override
    protected void onDestroy() {
    super.onDestroy();

    unbindDrawables(findViewById(R.id.RootView));
    System.gc();
    }

    private void unbindDrawables(View view) {
        if (view.getBackground() != null) {
        view.getBackground().setCallback(null);
        }
        if (view instanceof ViewGroup) {
            for (int i = 0; i < ((ViewGroup) view).getChildCount(); i++) {
            unbindDrawables(((ViewGroup) view).getChildAt(i));
            }
        ((ViewGroup) view).removeAllViews();
        }
    }

This unbindDrawables() method explores the view tree recursively and:

  1. Removes callbacks on all the background drawables
  2. Removes childs on every viewgroup
share|improve this answer
3  
Good solution to a common problem. –  While-E Aug 8 '11 at 6:33
5  
This doesn't work for subclasses of AdapterView (ListView, GridView etc). –  Arjun Nov 18 '11 at 20:56
    
@Arjun Yes..it doesnot work for AdapterView subclasses. For that you need to handle exception. Rest it works fine. That's what I use in my code and it works fine. Hope this helps. –  hp.android Nov 21 '11 at 13:27
    
@hp.android By "handle this in the exception" do you have an example of what that would look like? I ask because I have pages of images in my PageAdapter and I'm getting worked over by this error :( –  Jackson May 2 '12 at 17:40
4  
@Jackson just change the condition: if (view instanceof ViewGroup && !(view instanceof AdapterView)) this will get rid of exception which you are getting for Adapter –  hp.android May 8 '12 at 6:29
show 2 more comments

Mostly for Google travelers from the future:

Most java tools are unfortunately unsuitable for this task, because they only analyze the JVM-Heap. Every Android Application also has a native heap, though, which also has to fit within the ~16 MB limit. It's usually used for bitmap data, for example. So you can run quite easily into Out Of Memory errors even though your JVM-Heap is chillin around 3 MBs, if you use a lot of drawables.

share|improve this answer
2  
starting Android 3.0 (honeycomb) drawables are stored in the heap –  Gu1234 Sep 13 '11 at 8:16
    
@Timo then what would you use to detect leaks in the native heap? –  sydd Dec 5 '11 at 2:59
1  
Testing, lots of testing. Problem is that you can't even really tell how much memory your app is using, due to memory sharing and other optimization techniques. You can get memory readings using the usual shell commands, but those are very, very rough estimates. –  Timo Ohr Dec 6 '11 at 9:03
add comment

Good Google I/O talk (2011) on Memory Management in Android, as well as details on tools + techniques for memory profiling:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_CruQY55HOk

share|improve this answer
3  
Or the corresponding blog post: android-developers.blogspot.com/2011/03/… –  greg7gkb Apr 17 '12 at 0:35
add comment

The answer from @hp.android works well if you are just working with bitmap backgrounds but, in my case, I had a BaseAdapter providing a set of ImageViews for a GridView. I modified the unbindDrawables() method as advised so that the condition is:

if (view instanceof ViewGroup && !(view instanceof AdapterView)) {
  ...
}

but the problem then is that the recursive method never processes the children of the AdapterView. To address this, I instead did the following:

if (view instanceof ViewGroup) {
  ViewGroup viewGroup = (ViewGroup) view;
  for (int i = 0; i < viewGroup.getChildCount(); i++)
    unbindDrawables(viewGroup.getChildAt(i));

  if (!(view instanceof AdapterView))
    viewGroup.removeAllViews();
}

so that the children of the AdapterView are still processed -- the method just doesn't attempt to remove all children (which is unsupported).

This doesn't quite fix the problem however since ImageViews manage a bitmap that is not their background. I therefore added the following. It's not ideal but it works:

if (view instanceof ImageView) {
  ImageView imageView = (ImageView) view;
  imageView.setImageBitmap(null);
}

Overall the unbindDrawables() method is then:

private void unbindDrawables(View view) {
  if (view.getBackground() != null)
    view.getBackground().setCallback(null);

  if (view instanceof ImageView) {
    ImageView imageView = (ImageView) view;
    imageView.setImageBitmap(null);
  } else if (view instanceof ViewGroup) {
    ViewGroup viewGroup = (ViewGroup) view;
    for (int i = 0; i < viewGroup.getChildCount(); i++)
    unbindDrawables(viewGroup.getChildAt(i));

    if (!(view instanceof AdapterView))
      viewGroup.removeAllViews();
  }
}

I'm hoping there is a more principled approach to freeing up such resources.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Valgrind has been ported to Android (sponsored by Mozilla). See Valgrind on Android — Current Status and Support Running Valgrind for Android on ARM (comment 67).

share|improve this answer
    
that would require a custom rom to be built. –  Akshat Jun 16 '12 at 3:55
add comment

Well, those are the tools that hook with the unique formats that Android uses..I think what you may be unsatisfied with is the underlying testing code framework in use..

Have you tried mock testing areas of code using the Android Mock Framework?

share|improve this answer
1  
not so much, testing of that nature isn't so much the issue as recording what's actually happening while the application runs, what I really need is a resource/memory leak profiling tool –  jottos Jul 20 '09 at 18:48
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.