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Here's my question, how can I change an object outside of it's class, so that it maintains the changes made in the outside class?

Here's an example of the code:

Main class:

    public class Main {

        public static void main(String[] args)
        {
            Variable var = new Variable(1,2,3);
            Change.changeVar(var);
            System.out.println("" + var.geta() + "" + var.getb() + "" + var.getc());
        }
    }

Variable class:

public class Variable {

private int a;
private int b;
private int c;

public Variable(int a, int b, int c)
{
    this.a = a;
    this.b = b;
    this.c = c;
}

public int geta()
{
    return this.a;
}

public int getb()
{
    return this.b;
}

public int getc()
{
    return this.c;
}

}

Change class:

public class Change {

public static void changeVar(Variable var)
{
    Variable var2 = new Variable(4,5,6);
    var = var2;
}

}

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6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your example, no. When changeVar() exits, the parameter var is discarded, and the var in your main() method retains its original value. Read up on pass by reference.

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So, in other words, I can change the values within the variable object, but I can't directly just say the the variable object equals something else. Did I understand that right? –  John Jul 13 '12 at 14:31
    
Right; the assignment of var inside the changeVar() method only changes that method call's local variable var, which initially refers to the same object but on assignment refers to the new object (which is distinct from the passed-in object). –  Will Jul 13 '12 at 14:46
    
Ok, I understand that. Thanks for helping me. –  John Jul 13 '12 at 14:49
    
No problem. The other answers here describe ways to mutate the original object, which can be very useful and is common in Java. –  Will Jul 13 '12 at 14:51
    
Ok, I'll definately look at them. –  John Jul 13 '12 at 14:56
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Doing it that way? You can't.

You're passing a reference to the instance. However, inside the function, you use a new reference. Assigning to the new reference does not affect others.

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You cannot do it in a way that you described, because in Java variables are passed by values. However you can achieve the desired effect in a different way:

public class Variable {

    private int a;
    private int b;
    private int c;

    public Variable(int a, int b, int c)
    {
        this.a = a;
        this.b = b;
        this.c = c;
    }
    public int geta()
    {
        return this.a;
    }

    public int getb()
    {
        return this.b;
    }

    public int getc()
    {
        return this.c;
    }

    public void seta(int a) { this.a = a; }
    public void setb(int b) { this.a = b; }
    public void setc(int c) { this.a = c; }
}

public class Change {

    public static void changeVar(Variable var)
    {
        var.seta(4);
        var.setb(5);
        var.setc(6);
    }

}
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public class Variable {

    private int a;
    private int b;
    private int c;

    public Variable(int a, int b, int c)
    {
        this.a = a;
        this.b = b;
        this.c = c;
    }

    public int geta()
    {
        return this.a;
    }

    public int getb()
    {
        return this.b;
    }

    public int getc()
    {
        return this.c;
    }

    // depending on your use case, setters might be more appropriate
    // it depends on how you want to control the changing of the vars
    public void update(int a, int b, int c) {
        this.a = a;
        this.b = b;
        this.c = c;
    }

}

public class Change {

    public static void changeVar(Variable var)
    {
        var.update(4,5,6);
    }
}
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You need to provide setter methods and call them on the original object:

public void seta(int newa) { this.a = newa; }

Then you would say

public static void changeVar(Variable var)
{
    var.seta(4);
    //etc
}

You are merely repointing the local variable reference var to point to your new instance var2. It has no effect on the value of the original instance passed into the method.

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public static void changeVar(Variable var)
{
    Variable var2 = new Variable(4,5,6);
    var = var2;
}

first, u can write some setter methods in Variable class, then you can call these setter methods in the above code, like var.setA(4) ... and so on.enter code here

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