Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am confused about the definition of word size.I read that the word size of a processor is its data bus width. Like an 8 bit processor has an 8 bit wide data bus. I recently read that the maximum size of the virtual address space is determined by word size i.e. if the word size is n bits the max virtual address space is 2^n -1. But i always thought that maximum virtual address space is determined by address bus width i.e. an n bits wide address bus can address maximum 2^n bytes. So, what is true?

Also, is this related to pointers as an n bit data bus is capable of carrying only an n bit address. So, maximum 2^n bytes can be accessed via pointers.

share|improve this question
    
Pointers are more of a programming language concept than an architecture one; they are an abstraction of memory addresses. –  larsmans Jul 13 '12 at 14:41
    
@larsmans...By pointers i meant indirect addressing, which is an integral part of the instruction set architecture of a processor and which involves carrying address on data bus –  avinash Jul 13 '12 at 16:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I'll first say that some of your confusion probably comes from the fact that things were simpler a few decades ago and your understanding of terms is based on these simpler machines.

I am confused about the definition of word size.I read that the word size of a processor is its data bus width. Like an 8 bit processor has an 8 bit wide data bus.

Definitely not. Data bus with is completely unrelated to this. The word size (which has never really been a precise term) of a processor is best loosely defined as the largest natural size for arithmetic which is generally the size of the registers in the machine. This is quite frequently the width of the data path (which is distinctly different from the data bus). The data path is simply the width of the ALUs. The word size is often the same as the pointer size.

I recently read that the maximum size of the virtual address space is determined by word size i.e. if the word size is n bits the max virtual address space is 2^n -1. But i always thought that maximum virtual address space is determined by address bus width i.e. an n bits wide address bus can address maximum 2^n bytes. So, what is true?

No. The size of the virtual address space is simply determined by the number of bits in the virtual page number of the page table (and the TLB). On current amd64 based machines, only 48 bits of the virtual address are useable. The upper 16 are a sign extension of bit 47. On current amd64 machines, the physical address size is 52 bits. These physical address bits are the ones that are sent on the bus. Though even the term bus is really incorrect. Almost all links are point-to-point (DDRx DRAM is an exception) and use a packetized format (header + payload) instead of address wires and data wires.

Also, is this related to pointers as an n bit data bus is capable of carrying only an n bit address. So, maximum 2^n bytes can be accessed via pointers.

Many (almost all even) machines that have a separate address bus, use an address bus that is narrower than the the number of address bits. These bits are simply split up and sent across the bus using multiple clock cycles. DDRx DRAM is another example of this.

share|improve this answer
    
@nathan...i understood the fact of word size and data bus(thanks for that)...but regarding virtual address,i have learnt that cpu produces a logical address where(if memory is unsegmented)page number is a part and then there is an offset. Now the 2^(total number of bits of this logical address) =total virtual address space. Isn't it?...And if datapath(=word size) carries this address(and program counter has to save this address, so the address can't be greater than word size)...shouldn't word size be equal to total virtual address bits?...Or can it be possible that some bits of word are unused –  avinash Jul 13 '12 at 19:46
    
On current x86 machines, the word size is 64 bits, but you are not allowed to use the upper 16 bits. They are required to be a sign extension of bit 47. I guess that you can argue that the virtual address in this case is 64 bits, but the reality is that you are not allowed to use more than 48 of them. You are correct about the page number and offset thing. On x86, with 4k pages, the virtual page number is 36 bits and the offset is 12 bits (48 bits total). The physical page number is 40 bits in this case. –  Nathan Binkert Jul 13 '12 at 21:33

the maximum size of the virtual address space is determined by word size

This used to be true, but certain extensions were made to bypass this limitation (namely Physical Address Extension, or PAE) which enables such things as 36 bit memory addresses.

Aside from that, wikipedia defines a word as:

the natural unit of data used by a particular processor design

In almost all cases, this is 32 bits on 32 bit systems and 64 bits on 64 bit systems. You will still frequently find references to 32 bit words on 64 bit systems (partially because amd64 is an extension of intel x86 rather than a revision). Also, as a holdover from the earlier days of modern computing, you will frequently see 32 bit quantities referred to as a DWORD or double word, and 64 bit ones as a QWORD or quad word.

This is something people fight about all the time. I personally use the definition of word size == bus width.

share|improve this answer
    
@wug...your answer surely increased my knowledge but didn't clear my doubt...word size==bus width...which bus? data or address...and which bus controls the maximum virtual memory size in a normal basic case (i.e. not considering cases like 36 bit memory addresses )... –  avinash Jul 13 '12 at 16:17
    
There are a lot of different types of words. Different components of the computer often have different word sizes. When you talk about a 32 bit processor, you are talking about a processor with a 32 bit word size, though some components (like the memory bus) may natively use a different size. Special tricks are then done by the processor to access the address space provided by the remaining bits. The "definition of word size" depends on which word you're defining. Here's the wikipedia page: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Word_(computer_architecture) –  Wug Jul 13 '12 at 17:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.