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I have a form that, when submitted, goes through the usual e.preventDefault() and sends an ajax request instead. However, if this ajax request returns a certain condition, I want the form to be submitted normally. How do I achieve this?

// Submit handler
$(".reserveer_form").submit(function(event){
  event.preventDefault();

  $.ajax({
    url: $(this).attr("action"),
    data: $(this).serialize(),
    success: function(data) {
      if($(".messagered",data).length > 0){
        var errors = $(".messagered",data);
        $(".gegevens").before(errors);
      } else {
          // SUBMIT THE FORM!
      } 

    }
  });

})
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1  
$(".reserveer_form").submit()? –  jeschafe Jul 13 '12 at 14:27
3  
@jeschafe That could cause an infinte loop... –  Chandu Jul 13 '12 at 14:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Invoke the native submit method on the form, so that it doesn't trigger the jQuery handler.

$.ajax({
    context: this, // <-- set the context.
    url: $(this).attr("action"),
    data: $(this).serialize(),
    success: function (data) {
        if ($(".messagered", data).length > 0) {
            var errors = $(".messagered", data);
            $(".gegevens").before(errors);
        } else {
            this.submit(); // <-- submit the form
        }
    }
});
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Since your comment says you change a form variable, you could start your submit handler by checking that same form variable. If it is changed, just return true. If not, continue with the current handler.

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You can use the submit() method or forms:

$(".reserveer_form").submit(function(event){
  event.preventDefault();
  var form = this,
      $form = $(form);

  $.ajax({
    url: $form.attr("action"),
    data: $form.serialize(),
    success: function(data) {
      var errors = $(".messagered", data);
      if (errors.length > 0){
        $(".gegevens").before(errors);
      } else {
        form.submit();
      }
    }
  });
})

However, this seems to be a strange ajax request. First, you send the form (serialized, via ajax) to the server, and when the response contains no errors you send it again? The server would process it twice (and act twice, depending on your form). Also, the user does not get a message that his input is already processed - he clicks "submit", and it always takes a time until it is visibly submitted (where he even could change some input).

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If you trigger the jQuery handler, you'll have an infinite loop. –  squint Jul 13 '12 at 14:32
    
oops, fixed. At first I only wanted use it directly, but then I cached the jQuery instance in $form and didn't recognize that would change the behaviour :-) –  Bergi Jul 13 '12 at 14:40
    
I'd remove the DV if I could, but it wasn't mine. Although I wouldn't consider this request to be strange. It's just doing the necessary server-side validation, and rejecting the submission if there were errors. –  squint Jul 13 '12 at 14:42
    
...only that it submits effectively the form, even to the actual url. There is no big difference to a non-ajax submit, but if the first "validation" request was successful it will be performed a second time, just dropping the (valuable) results. –  Bergi Jul 13 '12 at 14:47

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