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How do I ignore forward slash and space at the start of the line in regular expressions?

In the Example below, I need to ignore the pipe and space because I am using grep and awk

The actual command gives me

cmd

size=5.0G features='0' hwhandler='0' wp=rw
|-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=active
| `- 3:0:0:3   sdh  8:112   active ready running    #Line 3
`-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled
  `- 4:0:0:3   sdl  8:176   active ready running    #Line 5

By doing this:

cmd | grep -E '[0-9]+:[0-9]+:[0-9]+:[0-9]+' | awk '{print $3}'

I was able to get the sdh, sdl. But the problem is, I need to ignore the '|' upfront, to make the Line 3 and Line 5 same. Please advise.

Edit 1 I need to get two information

1) the Number

3:0:0:3
4:0:0:3

2) Disk name

sdh
sdl
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3  
There's no slash in your example. – larsmans Jul 13 '12 at 14:47
    
Sorry that is '|' not slash...... I dont know what it is.... – howtechstuffworks Jul 13 '12 at 14:49
    
Okay, I did not use the work pipe, since it might confuse..... – howtechstuffworks Jul 13 '12 at 14:50
1  
What is the command? It may have options that modify the format of the output. – Dennis Williamson Jul 13 '12 at 14:53
3  
XYProblem – Dennis Williamson Jul 13 '12 at 14:54
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Rather than try to make each of your two lines have identical number of fields, just use the -o option of grep to only part of the line that matches your regular expression. Then you won't need the awk command at all.

cmd | grep -o -E '[0-9]+:[0-9]+:[0-9]+:[0-9]+'

Since you actually need more than just what was in your original question:

cmd | grep -E '[0-9]+:[0-9]+:[0-9]+:[0-9]+' | sed 's/^| //' | awk '{print $2, $3}'
share|improve this answer
    
Actually I need other informations in the line also....... like the disk name sdh/sdl etc etc..... – howtechstuffworks Jul 13 '12 at 14:52
5  
@howtechstuffworks and that's why we need to know what you're expecting as output. – kojiro Jul 13 '12 at 14:53

Do it all in awk:

gawk --re-interval '/[0-9:]{4}/ { sub("\\|", ""); print $2, $3 }'

See @CodeGnome's version below for a more precise regex.

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+1. I like your solution, but I'd add awk --re-interval '/([[:digit:]]:){3,}[[:digit:]]/ { sub("\\|", ""); print $2, $3 }' as a gawk alternative because it's a little more expressive. – CodeGnome Jul 13 '12 at 15:28
    
Ah better, forgot about the quantifiers, will add it to my example. – Thor Jul 13 '12 at 15:29

You should probably adjust your command to provide less cruft to your regular expression matcher. However, you can certainly do this with a Perl-compatible regular expression. For example:

$ pcregrep -o '((\d:){3}\d)\s+\S+' << 'EOF'
size=5.0G features='0' hwhandler='0' wp=rw
|-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=active
| `- 3:0:0:3   sdh  8:112   active ready running    #Line 3
`-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled
  `- 4:0:0:3   sdl  8:176   active ready running    #Line 5
EOF

3:0:0:3   sdh
4:0:0:3   sdl

You can then split the two fields using IFS, awk, or some other mechanism before feeding it to your next step in the script.

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