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Alright, So I have a dictionary as following:

{'A': ('0.1', '0.1'), 'C': ('0.3', '0.5'), 'B': ('0.2', '0.9'), 'D': ('0.4', '0.5'), 'I': ('3.0', '0.9'), 'H': ('2.2', '0.9')}

And the keys and corresponding 2 values are defined as such:

d[nodeName] = nodeDistance, parentD

The variable key names are being called by [nodeName] which is defined by a split of a previous string, inputing values A, B, C, D, H and I as 6 different keys in the dictionary. So my question is, how would i call the specific key of 'B' or 'I', because I am currently geting an error:

KeyError: 'B'

whenever I attempt to call key 'B' first value with this:

d['B'][0]

Would there be any way of calling the individual keys without using 'nodeName' as the locator?

Thanks!

EDIT:

AHHH, ok, so i was asking for variables that have not yet been defined! The first key it assigns is 'H', and i was asking for A, I ect that have yet to be assigned in the dictionary. Sorry, that was my mistake, thanks for your help though!

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can we see more code? this is working for me. –  Daniel Li Jul 13 '12 at 14:52
    
this works for me aswell –  iblazevic Jul 13 '12 at 14:55
    
** updated question –  Sean Jul 13 '12 at 15:02
1  
What kind of data goes into getDistance? Does it ever get a string starting with B? –  larsmans Jul 13 '12 at 15:06
    
Please delete your question, it's pretty useless in its current state. –  martineau Jul 13 '12 at 15:41
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closed as too localized by Kev Jul 14 '12 at 0:02

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3 Answers

Your example works as is for me:

>>> d={'A': ('0.1', '0.1'), 'C': ('0.3', '0.5'), 'B': ('0.2', '0.9'), 'D': ('0.4', '0.5'), 'I': ('3.0', '0.9'), 'H': ('2.2', '0.9')}
>>> d
{'A': ('0.1', '0.1'), 'C': ('0.3', '0.5'), 'B': ('0.2', '0.9'), 'D': ('0.4', '0.5'), 'I': ('3.0', '0.9'), 'H': ('2.2', '0.9')}
>>> d['A'][0]
'0.1'
>>> d['A']
('0.1', '0.1')
>>> d['B']
('0.2', '0.9')
>>> d['B'][0]
'0.2'
>>> modeName='I'
>>> d[modeName][1]
'0.9'

d or modeDict are a much better variable names. dict as a variable will override the built-in dictionary constructor.

From your edit:

>>> for i,modeName in enumerate('ABCDEFG'):
...    modeDict[modeName]=i,i**i
... 
>>> modeDict
{'A': (0, 1), 'C': (2, 4), 'B': (1, 1), 'E': (4, 256), 'D': (3, 27), 'G': (6, 46656), 'F': (5, 3125)}
>>> modeDict['A'][1]
1

If think your issue is elsewhere?

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If I understand you correctly, you could use values():

>>> d = {'A': ('0.1', '0.1'), 'C': ('0.3', '0.5'), 'B': ('0.2', '0.9'), 
'D': ('0.4', '0.5'), 'I': ('3.0', '0.9'), 'H': ('2.2', '0.9')}
>>> d.values()
[('0.1', '0.1'),
 ('0.3', '0.5'),
 ('0.2', '0.9'),
 ('0.4', '0.5'),
 ('3.0', '0.9'),
 ('2.2', '0.9')]
 >>> d.values()[0]
('0.1', '0.1')
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values()[0] doesn't make all that much sense, though, because the dictionary is unordered and so you can't guarantee what key the 0th value corresponds to. –  DSM Jul 13 '12 at 15:00
    
Haha - good point DSM –  Raz Jul 13 '12 at 15:01
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Are you sure that your dictionary contains what you think it does? KeyError: 'B' is telling you that 'B' does not exist in the dictionary.

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