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I am trying to nail down my understanding of the aforementioned principle and doing so by reading over and over the wikipedia entry.

Putting aside the concepts of Covariance and Contravariance that still give me grief, wikipedia mentions also that invariants of the supertype must be preserved in the subtype and the History Constraint or history rule. Based on these last two concepts I came up with this small example:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var fooUser = new FooUser();

        var fooBase = new FooBase("Serge");

        var fooDerived = new FooDerived("Serge");

        fooUser.Use(fooBase); //will print "Serge"
        fooUser.Use(fooDerived); //will print "New User"

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

public class FooUser
{
    public void Use(IFoo foo)
    {
        foo.DoSomething();
        Console.WriteLine(foo.Name);
    }
}

public interface IFoo
{
    string Name { get; }
    void DoSomething();
}

public class FooBase : IFoo
{
    public string Name { get; protected set; }

    public FooBase(string name)
    {
        Name = name;
    }

    public virtual void DoSomething()
    {
    }
}

public class FooDerived : FooBase
{
    public FooDerived(string name) : base(name)
    {
    }

    public override void DoSomething()
    {
        Name = "New Name";

        base.DoSomething();
    }
}

So my question is: based on the two above mentioned concepts, am I violating the principle with this example? If not, why?

Thank you very much in advance.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To violate the LSP you need a client class which makes some assumption on the class interface. The assumption must not exactly be expressed in a formal way, sometimes it just comes from a context of the usage.

Supose you have an enumerable class which allows you to add elements. The assumption of the client can be for example that if it adds N elements then exactly N elements can be read from the collection. Then you derive a set from your collection which removes duplicate elements upon adding. The client expectation is wrong now, as even if N elements are added, sometimes LESS THAN N elements can be read.

To me then the violation of the LSP needs a context which defines some expectations. Since there are no expectations in your code, the LSP is not violated.

This need of a context mean also that two classes can violate the LSP for one client context while the same classes possibly do not violate the LSP in other contexts.

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your explanation provides a nice perspective –  vibhu Jan 3 at 18:30

You do not appear to be violating LSP here. I 'm leaving a small window for doubt because theoretically we know nothing about the invariants of FooBase, but making a reasonable guess about these results in seeing no apparent issues.

Assuming that the invariants are fine, that leaves the history principle matter that the derived class allows the value of Name to change during the lifetime of the object where the base class does not. This would certainly seem to be a violation of LSP, if not for one small detail: Name has a protected setter.

A protected setter should mean that the author of FooBase expects derived classes to change the value of Name during the object's lifetime even if the base class does not happen to do this. Contrast this with a protected field name, which cannot have different access levels for getting and setting its value.

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The fact that derived classes can set Name does not necessarily imply an expectation that such modification may legitimately occur after an instance has been exposed to the public. It would be entirely possible that the setter is only intended to be used for factory methods which might not know the proper name of the object until after the factory has started working with it. –  supercat Jun 30 at 22:45

The example's not really robust enough to say, partly because C# doesn't have a clean way to express class invariants. Or, rather, if it does, I'm not aware of it.

I'd say you're not violating an invariant, because FooBase hasn't made a guarantee that Name won't change or expressed a range of allowable values for Name. Quite the opposite - by including a protected setter for Name, FooBase is creating an expectation that that value can be changed by the internal mechanism of a derived class.

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LSP violation is essentially a violation, if either
1. Invarint of the super type are violated by the sub type OR
2. Preconditions of the super type are strengthened by the sub type OR
3. Post Conditions are weakened by the Sub type.

The above three conditions must be pre decided, while interface design, by a formal 'Design by Contract'.
In your example FooBase does not define any formal rules to be obeyed by any of the extending classes.
Moreover name setter has a protected access. Hence I don't think LSP is violated.

But

Sometimes it may also be helpful if LSP violation is analysed with respect to the test cases.

Does this test case make sense:
fooUser.Use(fooBase); //will print "Serge"
String nameDerived = fooUser.Use(fooDerived); //will print "New User" ( assuming this returns the name )

assert( nameDerived equals "Serge" )

If such a test case exists ( as a necessiated by specs ) , then , obviously the above example violates LSP.

More so at my blog : http://design-principle-pattern.blogspot.in/2013/12/liskov-substitution-principle.html

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