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As a C#/Java Programmer I'm having a hard time getting the following problem solved:

There is a base class "B". In its init Method it calls a method "SetupStuff". For the base class this method is just empty.

Then there is a derived class "D" that inherits from "B". D implements the method "SetupStuff", too (and actually does something there).

The problem is: When I create an object of D, its "SetupStuff" is never called. The init method of B is called, then the empty "SetupStuff" of is called.

What would I need to do to make the derived class's method being called?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you are trying to invoke an override from inside your initializer, it is not going to work. The reason for it is easy to understand: since the override belongs to a subclass, and because the superclass instance initialization needs to be complete before the subclass initialization can start, calling a derived method would have violated the rules that by the time a "regular" method is called the initialization of the instance has completed. Generally, calling virtuals from Java or C# constructors is not a good idea, for the same exact reason. In C++, calling virtuals from a constructor redirects to the implementation in the cosntructor's own class (i.e. the same thing that you observe in Objective C).

Unlike C# and Java where overriding static methods is not allowed, Objective C lets you provide class-specific implementations of class methods. You can use this mechanism to achieve what you are trying to do: define a class method in the derived class, and call it from the base class, like this:

@interface TT : NSObject
-(id)init;
@end

@interface Test1 : TT
+(void)doit;
@end

@interface Test2 : TT
+(void)doit;
@end

@implementation Test1
+(void) doit {
    NSLog(@"Test1");
}
@end

@implementation Test2
+(void) doit {
    NSLog(@"Test2");
}
@end

@implementation TT
-(id) init {
    if (self=[super init]) {
        // The "magic" is in the following line:
        [self->isa doit];
    }
    return self;
}
@end

When you call

[[Test1 alloc] init];
[[Test2 alloc] init];

you see

Test1
Test2

in the log.

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Good idea. But since the methods are now static I don't have access to the instance variables. So that's not working for me :-( –  Boris Jul 13 '12 at 17:03
    
@Boris You cannot possibly have access to instance variables, because when you are inside [super init], the instance variables of your derived class have not been initialized yet. If you need access to variables of the base class, however, that easily can be arranged: you can pass its self pointer to the static method, and it would be able to access ivars of the base. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 13 '12 at 17:05
    
Hum, I can't get your code working. The compiler keeps telling me: "Class method +doit not found". And when executing the code the app crashes on the call... –  Boris Jul 13 '12 at 17:18
1  
you can just do [self class] instead of self->isa –  user102008 Oct 20 '12 at 8:30
1  
direct access to self->isa is now obsolete. look at this:stackoverflow.com/questions/14590637/… –  KiNG Dec 17 '13 at 10:12
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all methods in objective-c are virtual by default. so you just have to implement method you want to override in your derived class. just don't forget to call parent method to be sure, that you didn' miss anything

And make sure, that you create instance of your D class, not B. If you create it like

[[D alloc] init];

then overridden method should be called properly

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Did you forget to intialize the child method with:

-(void) SetupStuff{ // This is the child class implementation
[super SetupStuff];
}

in objective-c you have to call manually the parent methods, even if they are overwriting pre-existent methods.

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I think the OP is looking to do it exactly the other way around: his super needs to call an override in the derived. –  dasblinkenlight Jul 13 '12 at 16:06
    
Exactly. The super needs to call an override in the derived, but it doesn't... –  Boris Jul 13 '12 at 16:09
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