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I have an array here:

var myArr = [1, 1, 2, 5, 5, 7, 8, 9, 9];

Now I want to remove both appearances of a duplicate. So the desired result is not:

var myArr = [1, 2, 5, 7, 8 ,9];

but

var myArr = [2, 7, 8];

Basically I know how to remove duplicates, but not in that that special way. Thats why any help would be really appreciated!

Please note: My array is filled with strings. The numbers here were only used as an example.

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3  
is it always ordered and/or numeric? –  jeschafe Jul 13 '12 at 16:22
    
Could a value occur more than twice? –  j08691 Jul 13 '12 at 16:24
    
@jeschafe: why does that matter ? you can't do it in a sublinear time anyway ... if that's what you were after –  Razvan Jul 13 '12 at 16:24
    
@jeschafe It's filled with strings, not ordered. j08691: No, no value can occur more than twice. –  Sven Jul 13 '12 at 16:26
    
Just because it can affect how the code is written. Some of the ones below don't work with strings in the aray. –  jeschafe Jul 13 '12 at 16:37
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

jsfiddle for this code:

var myArr = [1, 1, 2, 5, 5, 7, 8, 9, 9];
var newArr = myArr;
var h,i,j;


for(h = 0; h < myArr.length; h++) {
    var curItem = myArr[h];
    var foundCount = 0;
    // search array for item
    for(i = 0; i < myArr.length; i++) {
        if (myArr[i] == myArr[h])
            foundCount++;
    }
    if(foundCount > 1) {
        // remove repeated item from new array
        for(j = 0; j < newArr.length; j++) {
            if(newArr[j] == curItem) {                
                newArr.splice(j, 1);
                j--;
            }
        }            
    }
}
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Wherever removing duplicates is involved, it's not a bad idea to use a set data structure.

JavaScript doesn't have a native set implementation, but the keys of an object work just as well - and in this case help because then the values can be used to keep track of how often an item appeared in the array:

function removeDuplicates(arr) {
    var counts = arr.reduce(function(counts, item) {
        counts[item] = (counts[item]||0)+1;
        return counts;
    }, {});
    return Object.keys(counts).reduce(function(arr, item) {
        if(counts[item] === 1) {
            arr.push(item);
        }
        return arr;
    }, []);
}

var myArr = [1, 1, 2, 5, 5, 7, 8, 9, 9];
removeDuplicates(myArr);

Check out the example on jsfiddle.

Alternately, you could not use calls to reduce(), and instead use for and for(item in counts) loops:

function removeDuplicates(arr) {
    var counts = {};
    for(var i=0; i<arr.length; i++) {
        var item = arr[i];
        counts[item] = (counts[item]||0)+1;
    }
    var arr = [];
    for(item in counts) {
        if(counts[item] === 1) {
            arr.push(item);
        }
    }
    return arr;
}

Check out the example on jsfiddle.

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1  
much as I like .reduce, I suspect a simple iteration over the counts object would be more efficient... –  Alnitak Jul 13 '12 at 17:07
    
@Alnitak - Do you meant something like for item in counts { /*...*/ }? –  Richard JP Le Guen Jul 13 '12 at 18:41
1  
Yes, that's what I meant. The overhead of calling a function for each iteration with .reduce can be quite high. –  Alnitak Jul 13 '12 at 18:47
    
If you view the jspref in my answer you can see these don't perform that well –  Murtnowski Jul 14 '12 at 16:58
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Here's my version

var a = [1, 1, 2, 5, 5, 7, 8, 9, 9];

function removeIfduplicate( arr ) {
    var discarded = [];
    var good      = [];
    var test;
    while( test = arr.pop() ) {
        if( arr.indexOf( test ) > -1 ) {
            discarded.push( test );
            continue;
        } else if( discarded.indexOf( test ) == -1 ) {
            good.push( test );
        }
    }
    return good.reverse();
}

x = removeIfduplicate( a );
console.log( x ); //[2, 7, 8]
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EDITED with better answer:

var myArr = [1, 1, 2, 5, 5, 7, 8, 9, 9];

function removeDuplicates(arr) {
    var i, tmp;
    for(i=0; i<arr.length; i++) {
        tmp = arr.lastIndexOf(arr[i]);
        if(tmp === i) {
            //Only one of this number
        } else {
            //More than one
            arr.splice(tmp, 1);
            arr.splice(i, 1);
        }
    }
}
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I was going to post an answer using this strategy. Here's is the jsFiddle I had written to help: jsfiddle.net/VBYun –  Jesse Jul 13 '12 at 16:34
    
At the end, myArr contains [1, 5, 7, 9] . –  j08691 Jul 13 '12 at 16:34
    
Ugh, I just realized this will only work if there are only 2 of the numbers in the array. If that's the max, there's a much easier way of checking the lastIndexOf() against the current i value. If they match, you're good, if they don't you can delete both based on the index you have for each. –  Joel Fischer Jul 13 '12 at 16:35
1  
var myArr = [1, 1, 2, 5, 5, 7, 8, 9, 9]; function removeDuplicates(arr) { var i, tmp; for(i=0; i<arr.length; i++) { tmp = arr.lastIndexOf(arr[i]); if(tmp === i) { //Only one of this number } else { //More than one arr.splice(tmp, 1); arr.splice(i, 1); } } } console.log(removeDuplicates(myArr)); ​ –  Joel Fischer Jul 13 '12 at 16:39
    
I like this answer... but I don't think it works if the elements aren't in order: jsfiddle.net/vBcmp –  Richard JP Le Guen Jul 14 '12 at 21:30
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If it's just alphanumeric, duplicates are case-sensitive, and there can be no more than two of any element, then something like this can work:

var a = [2, 1, "a", 3, 2, "A", "b", 5, 6, 6, "B", "a"],

    clean_array = $.map(a.sort(), function (v,i) {
        a[i] === a[i+1] && (a[i] = a[i+1] = null);
        return a[i];
    });

// clean_array = [1,3,5,"A","B","b"]
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EDIT: Here is the jspref http://jsperf.com/deleting-both-values-from-array

http://jsfiddle.net/3u7FK/1/

This is the fastest way to do it in two passes without using any fancy tricks and keeping it flexible. You first spin through and find the count of every occurance and put it into and keyvalue pair. Then spin through it again and filter out the ones where the count was greater than 1. This also has the advanatage of being able to apply other filters than just "greater than 1"; as well as the having the count of occurances if you needed that as well for something else.

This should work with strings as well instead of numbers.

http://jsfiddle.net/mvBY4/1/

var myArr = [1, 1, 2, 5, 5, 7, 8, 9, 9];
var map = new Object();

for(var i = 0; i < myArr.length; i++)
{
    if(map[myArr[i]] === undefined)
    {
        map[myArr[i]] = 1;
    }
    else
    {
        map[myArr[i]]++;
    }
}

var result = new Array();

for(var i = 0; i < myArr.length; i++)
{   
    if(map[myArr[i]] > 1)
    {
        //do nothing
    }
    else
    {
        result.push(myArr[i]);
    }

}

alert(result);
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If performance and speed is what you're going for, the second loop iterates more often than it has to. Like @Alnitak suggested, you should use a for(key in map) { /*...*/ } loop –  Richard JP Le Guen Jul 14 '12 at 21:45
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