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I have a large file which I want to format in a certain manner. File input example:

DVL1    03220   NP_004412.2 VANGL2  02758   Q9ULK5  in vitro    12490194
PAX3    09421   NP_852124.1 MEOX2   02760   NP_005915.2 in vitro;yeast 2-hybrid 11423130
VANGL2  02758   Q9ULK5  MAGI3   11290   NP_001136254.1  in vitro;in vivo    15195140

And this is how I want it to become:

DVL1    03220   NP_004412   VANGL2  02758   Q9ULK5
PAX3    09421   NP_852124   MEOX2   02760   NP_005915
VANGL2  02758   Q9ULK5  MAGI3   11290   NP_001136254

To summarize:

  • if the line has 1 dot, that dot is deleted along with the number after it and a \t is added, so the output line will only have 6 tab-separated values
  • if the line has 2 dots, those dots are deleted along with the numbers after them and a \t is added, so the output line will only have 6 tab-separated values
  • if the line has no dots, maintain the first 6 tab-separated values

My idea is currently something like this:

for line in infile:
    if "." in line: # thought about this and a line.count('.') might be better, just wasn't capable to make it work
        transformed_line = line.replace('.', '\t', 2) # only replaces the dot; want to replace dot plus next first character
        columns = transformed_line.split('\t')
        outfile.write('\t'.join(columns[:8]) + '\n') # if i had a way to know the position of the dot(s), i could join only the desired columns
    else:
        columns = line.split('\t')
        outfile.write('\t'.join(columns[:5]) + '\n') # this is fine

Hope I explained myself ok. Thanks for you guys effort.

share|improve this question
    
this can easily be done with sed. I guess you want python because it's part of a bigger program (?) –  c00kiemon5ter Jul 13 '12 at 16:31
    
Yup, this is just part of a function. –  Edward Coelho Jul 13 '12 at 16:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

you can try something like this:

    with open('data1.txt') as f:
        for line in f:
            line=line.split()[:6]
            line=map(lambda x:x[:x.index('.')] if '.' in x else x,line)  #if an element has '.' then
                                                                         #remove that dot else keep the element as it is
            print('\t'.join(line))

output:

DVL1    03220   NP_004412   VANGL2  02758   Q9ULK5
PAX3    09421   NP_852124   MEOX2   02760   NP_005915
VANGL2  02758   Q9ULK5  MAGI3   11290   NP_001136254

Edit:

as @mgilson suggested the line line=map(lambda x:x[:x.index('.')] if '.' in x else x,line) can be replaced by simply line=map(lambda x:x.split('.')[0],line)

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain step by step what you did? I'm not that good at programming. –  Edward Coelho Jul 13 '12 at 16:37
    
@EdwardCoelho I added some comments in the code. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 13 '12 at 16:40
    
Thanks for the comments. But I'm guessing, why after 'in'? –  Edward Coelho Jul 13 '12 at 16:42
    
I edited my solution, I removed those in related lines. Just use line.split()[0:6] to fetch the first 6 columns. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 13 '12 at 16:46
    
It is amazing man, just had to add a + '\n' after print('\t'.join(line), cause the output was just one big line. Thanks a lot! –  Edward Coelho Jul 13 '12 at 16:54
import re
with open(filename,'r') as f:
    newlines=(re.sub(r'\.\d+','',old_line) for old_line in f)
    newlines=['\t'.join(line.split()[:6]) for line in newlines]

Now you have a list of lines with the '.number' portions removed. As far as I can tell, your problem isn't well enough constrained to make this whole thing work in 1 pass with regex, but it'll work with 2.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain a little of how that line works? Thanks! –  Edward Coelho Jul 13 '12 at 16:38
    
its a regex... that replaces a "." followed by 1 or more #'s with nothing –  Joran Beasley Jul 13 '12 at 16:39
    
It doesn't quite give the desired output (yet). Still working on it... (I didn't realize that everything after the second dot should be truncated). –  mgilson Jul 13 '12 at 16:42
    
I got the idea, but I can't seem to find the correct spot to add the line to. Should I just do: "import re for line in infile: new_line=re.sub(r'\.\d+','',old_line)" ? –  Edward Coelho Jul 13 '12 at 16:47
    
@EdwardCoelho -- See my edit. –  mgilson Jul 13 '12 at 16:50

I figured somebody should do this with a single regex, so...

import re
beast_regex = re.compile(r'(\S+)\s+(\S+)\s+(\S+?)(?:\.\d+)?\s+(\S+)\s+(\S+)\s+(\S+?)(?:\.\d+)?\s+in.*')
with open('data.txt') as infile:
    for line in infile:
        match = beast_regex.match(line)
        print('\t'.join(match.groups())
share|improve this answer
    
(+1) -- although, this is pretty sensitive to the position of the '.'. e.g. (if I'm reading it correctly), you couldn't have 'foo.1' in the first column. –  mgilson Jul 13 '12 at 21:54

you can do this with a simple regex:

import re
for line in infile:
    line=re.sub(r'\.\d+','\t',line)
columns = line.split('\t')
outfile.write('\t'.join(columns[:5]) + '\n')

this replaces any "." followed by one or more digits with a tab character.

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