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I can see this curious behaviour from the garbage collector

public class A {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        String foo;
        try {
            foo = "bar";

            int yoo = 5; //1
        } catch (Exception e) {
        }

        int foobar = 3;//2 
    }
}

if I go to debug and put a breakpoint on //1 foo is not null and its value is "bar" but in breakpoint //2 foo is null, this can be difficult to understand while you are debug. My question is if there is any specification that says that this is a legal behaviour from the garbage collector

With this small variation it doesn't get Garbage collected:

public class A {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

        String foo;
        try {
            foo = "bar";
        } catch (Exception e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
        }

        int foobar = 3;
    }
}

Why?

share|improve this question
1  
Which debugger are you using? –  Dancrumb Jul 13 '12 at 16:45
    
Which debugger are you using? This behavior seems unlikely. –  Louis Wasserman Jul 13 '12 at 16:45
1  
Same behavior in IntelliJ as well. Let's see what the bytecode is. –  Voo Jul 13 '12 at 16:50
1  
In response to "If it's no longer used at that point, how would it affect debugging at that point? ": Because I'm researching a new API debugging its methods/returns –  Jaime Hablutzel Jul 13 '12 at 16:50
1  
@jaime your edit makes it even weirder - well done ;-) –  assylias Jul 13 '12 at 17:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In this case, you don't use the foo variable after setting it, so it would even be legal for the JVM to completely ignore the variable as it is never used and that would not change the result of your program.

However that's unlikely to happen in debug mode.

In your case, foo should not get GC'ed as long as it is in scope or you hold a reference to it, which includes the section after the try/catch block.

EDIT

Actually I get the same behaviour as what you describe in Netbeans 7.1.1 with Java 7.0_03...

One problem might be that because you don't set a default value to foo, you can't use it after the try/catch block (it would not compile).

Bytcode

  • With the code you use
public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
Code:
   0: ldc           #2                  // String bar
   2: astore_1      
   3: iconst_5      
   4: istore_2      
   5: goto          9
   8: astore_2      
   9: iconst_3      
  10: istore_2      
  11: return        
  • Using String foo = null; as the first statement, in which case the debugger see the value after the try/catch block:
public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
Code:
   0: aconst_null   
   1: astore_1      
   2: ldc           #2                  // String bar
   4: astore_1      
   5: iconst_5      
   6: istore_2      
   7: goto          11
  10: astore_2      
  11: iconst_3      
  12: istore_2      
  13: return        

I'm not a bytcode specialist but they look very similar to me...

CONCLUSION

My personal conclusion is that for the debugger to show the value of foo, it has to run a foo.toString() of some sort, which is not a valid statement after the catch block as foo might have not been initialized. Adding a System.out.println(foo) in that section is not legal (does not compile). The debugger is a bit lost as to what the value is and shows null.

To convince yourself that this has nothing to do with GC, you can try the following example:

public static void main(String[] args){
    String foo;
    char[] c = null;
    try {
        foo = "bar";
        c = foo.toCharArray();

        int yoo = 5; //1
    } catch (Exception e) {
    }

    int foobar = 3;//2 
}

On the foobar line, you can see that c holds bar but foo shows as null. So the String is still there, but the debugger can't show it.

Even funnier example:

public static void main(String[] args){
    String foo;
    List<String> list = new ArrayList<String>();

    try {
        foo = "bar";
        list.add(foo);
        int yoo = 5; //1
    } catch (Exception e) {
    }

    int foobar = 3;//2 

}

On the foobar line, foo shows as null, but list contains "bar"... Nice.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes that's right if I set foo to null before the try block it doesn't get GC'ed, but as you said in debug mode I do even need it –  Jaime Hablutzel Jul 13 '12 at 16:54
    
@jaime No GC is never run in this program. It's only a question of what the debugger shows us, the information is available in both cases. –  Voo Jul 13 '12 at 17:00

foo never has a default value, and when you go to line 2, you are stepping outside of the scope in which it was set.

share|improve this answer
    
Right, but I just want to debug it :*( –  Jaime Hablutzel Jul 13 '12 at 16:55
    
If this is true, isn't it a very dangerous behavior? –  Sid Jul 13 '12 at 16:56

The generated byte code is as follows:

  public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
    Code:
       0: ldc           #2                  // String bar
       2: astore_1
       3: iconst_5
       4: istore_2
       5: goto          9
       8: astore_2
       9: iconst_3
      10: istore_2
      11: return
    Exception table:
       from    to  target type
           0     5     8   Class java/lang/Exception

My first guess was, that we'd reuse the local variable position for both foo and foobar in which case the value wouldn't be available any longer to show when debugging. But as can be seen local 1 isn't overwritten (yoo and foobar share the same space though).

Since that doesn't happen and we can be extremely sure that the JIT isn't doing anything here, this is really strange behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
See my update - I don't see any difference with the bytecode generated when foo is initially set to null. –  assylias Jul 13 '12 at 16:58
    
@assylias Well you see a difference in the bytecode, but only the expected. Nothing out of the ordinary yes. –  Voo Jul 13 '12 at 17:00
    
Yes that's what I meant. –  assylias Jul 13 '12 at 17:05

This is not a legal behavior, as the context of the main method is still alive. It should ideally not get GCed unless you declared the String foo in the try block (in which case it won't be accessible at 2).

I tried this code and it's working fine for me.

share|improve this answer
    
Wrong. As long as the behavior cannot be seen from the executing thread (it can't obviously) it's perfectly valid to overwrite the value, GC it or whatever. –  Voo Jul 13 '12 at 16:53
    
I still doubt it. GC cannot collect the value as it's very much in scope and being used. –  Sid Jul 13 '12 at 16:55
    
Legal but obscurely and confusing behaviour for debugging purposes –  Jaime Hablutzel Jul 13 '12 at 16:56
    
Wow, I need to research this more. I will come up with an explanation soon. –  Sid Jul 13 '12 at 16:57
    
@SidCool The as-if rule overrules anything else. A quick liveness analysis can easily show that the variable is dead at this point, hence you can overwrite it, GC it or whatever. No legal program will ever notice the difference. –  Voo Jul 13 '12 at 16:58

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