Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The following code is to query an online thesaurus for a search engine I'm building as a college project, but I'm having problems with file_get_contents "failed to open stream" errors. When I send a word the thesaurus doesn't recognize, it throws up an error. I'm trying to write a piece of code that will ignore the error and just proceed without the information.

$thesaurus_search="http://words.bighugelabs.com/api/2/0089388bb57f/".$this->formatted_query."/php";
$result_thesaurus=file_get_contents($thesaurus_search);

I tried:

if (file_get_contents($thesaurus_search) != NULL)
{ // do stuff }

...but its not working because it still returns some sort of string.

What can I do to handle such cases?

share|improve this question
1  
What exactly does it return when there is an error? Some html? xml? json? You'd have to parse the returned data to check for the error codes - it's unlikely an api would simply return nothing. –  Marc B Jul 13 '12 at 17:50
    
"I'm trying to write a piece of code that will ignore the error and just proceed without the information". How would you proceed without the information? –  netcoder Jul 13 '12 at 17:53
    
Maybe I should be a little more specific, this code is part of a class, the information it returns is not intrinsic to the end product, its just a bonus. So if file_get_contents is returning an error(because it doesnt have a match for the word) I want to break out of the class altogether, and not return any code. –  shanahobo86 Jul 13 '12 at 18:26
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you don't want file_get_contents to report HTTP errors as PHP Warnings, then this is the clean way to do it, using a stream context (there is something specifically for that):

$context = stream_context_create(array(
    'http' => array('ignore_errors' => true),
));

$result = file_get_contents('http://your/url', false, $context);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Netcoder thats much better, appreciate your help. I'll stop hitting my computer with wrenches too :) –  shanahobo86 Jul 14 '12 at 10:18
    
Thanks much! I found it within the manual after much probing, but it wasn't readily apparent to me a context option could help. It'd be nice if this were right on the file_get_contents page. –  Errol Feb 17 at 17:38
add comment

The simplest solution if you're okay with just bailing out, would be:

if (empty($thesaurus_search)) { 
   return;
} else {
   //process with value
}

To more fully handle it, looking at the API, it looks like you should be checking the response header, e.g.:

$thesaurus_search="http://words.bighugelabs.com/api/2/0089388bb57f/".$this->formatted_query."/php";
$result_thesaurus=file_get_contents($thesaurus_search);
if ($http_response_header[0] = 'HTTP/1.1 200 OK') {
    //code to handle words
} else {
    // do something else?
}
share|improve this answer
    
Considering file_get_contents already returns false on error, I don't think that's necessary. –  netcoder Jul 13 '12 at 18:14
add comment

If I understand you properly you are trying to make an API call to http://words.bighugelabs.com. You need cURL to achieve this so if you have cURL installed then this code will work for you.

$ch = curl_init();
$thesaurus_search="http://words.bighugelabs.com/api/2/0089388bb57f/".$this->formatted_query."/php";
$options = array();
$options[CURLOPT_URL] = $thesaurus_search;
$options[CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER] = true;
curl_setopt_array($ch, $options);

// Print result.
print_r(curl_close($ch));
share|improve this answer
2  
"You need cURL to achieve this", no he doesn't. –  netcoder Jul 13 '12 at 18:05
add comment

You might try curl:

function curl_get_contents($url) {
    $ch = curl_init($url);
    curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_FOLLOWLOCATION, 1);
    curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_HEADER, 0);
    curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_USERAGENT, "Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 7.0; Windows NT 6.0)");
    curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_MAXREDIRS, 2); 
    curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, 1);
    $content = curl_exec($ch);
    curl_close($ch);
    return $content;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can use "@" to keep error messages from showing. If an error would have occurred, it simply returns a null value.

...
  $result_thesaurus=@file_get_contents($thesaurus_search);
if (!$result_thesaurus)
  echo "No match.";
share|improve this answer
    
That's really bad advice. –  netcoder Jul 13 '12 at 18:03
    
@netcoder: Why? –  Connor Peet Jul 13 '12 at 18:04
1  
It's considered a bad practice to use the error control operator. Setting display_errors to Off is a better alternative. –  netcoder Jul 13 '12 at 18:06
1  
No they're totally different. @ is the equivalent to error_reporting(0) which disables all error reporting, even fatal errors, to the function it's prepended to and all the ensuing call stack. display_errors = Off doesn't print them but still logs them. –  netcoder Jul 13 '12 at 18:17
2  
@shanahobo86: It's still wrong, there are other ways to do it. If your computer doesn't start, and you hit it with a wrench and it does, fine; but you still shouldn't. :) You'll end up having greater problems eventually. –  netcoder Jul 14 '12 at 0:33
show 4 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.