Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am not experienced in LISP and list processing, but I have a set of C++ STL vectors (or strings) on which I need to perform the following operations:

IdenticalHead (v1, v2): Return the biggest sequence that both v1 and v2 start with it.

IdenticalTail (v1, v2): Return the biggest sequence that both v1 and v2 end with it.

IdenticalTailHead (v1, v2): Return the biggest sequence that v1 ends with it and v2 starts with it.

For example:

if v1 = (a,b,c,e,f), v2 = (a,b,d,e,f), then:

IdenticalHead (v1, v2) = (a,b)
IdenticalTail (v1, v2) = (e,f)

if v1 = (a,b,c), v2 = (b,c,g), then:

IdenticalTailHead (v1, v2) = (b,c)

My question is that are these standard operations in LISP or any other language? Do they have standard names like CDR and CAR?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, there are no standard operators for these. But identical-head is not hard to write:

(defun identical-head (l1 l2)
  (and l1 l2 (equal (car l1) (car l2))
       (cons (car l1) (identical-head (cdr l1) (cdr l2)))))

I don't know of an easier way to write identical-tail except reversing the input lists, calling identical-head, and then reversing the result, since lists only allow forward traversal, not backward.

(defun identical-tail (l1 l2)
  (reverse (identical-head (reverse l1) (reverse l2))))

Here's how I'd write identical-tail-head:

(defun identical-tail-head (l1 l2)
  (labels ((starts-with-p (list prefix)
             (cond ((null prefix) t)
                   ((null list) nil)
                   ((equal (car list) (car prefix))
                    (starts-with-p (cdr list) (cdr prefix))))))
    (cond ((null l1) nil)
          ((starts-with-p l2 l1) l1)
          (t (identical-tail-head (cdr l1) l2)))))

It's not a very efficient way to do it, since it's O(n²), but (again) given that lists are forward-traversal-only, I haven't come up with a better way.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. My main question was if there is a standard name for these functions. Both this and Rainer's implementation gave me insight though. –  Ari Jul 14 '12 at 16:19

IdenticalHead and IdenticalTail are basically provided by the Common Lisp function MISMATCH.

CL-USER 81 > (mismatch '(a b c e f) '(a b d e f))
2

CL-USER 82 > (mismatch '(a b c e f) '(a b d e f) :from-end t)
3

CL-USER 83 > (defun identical-head (s1 s2)
               (let ((m (mismatch s1 s2)))
                 (if (numberp m)
                     (subseq s1 0 m)
                   s1)))
IDENTICAL-HEAD

CL-USER 84 > (identical-head '(a b c e f) '(a b d e f))
(A B)

CL-USER 85 > (defun identical-tail (s1 s2)
               (let ((m (mismatch s1 s2)))
                 (if (numberp m)
                   (subseq s1 (1+ m))
                   s1)))
IDENTICAL-TAIL

CL-USER 86 > (identical-tail '(a b c e f) '(a b d e f))
(E F)

The third function is more complicated:

CL-USER 87 > (defun identical-tail-head (s1 s2 &aux (l1 (length s1)))
               (loop for i from 0 below l1
                     for m = (mismatch s2 s1 :start2 i)
                     when (and m (= (+ i m) l1))
                     do (return (subseq s1 i))))

CL-USER 88 > (identical-tail-head '(a e d b c d) '(b c d a f))
(B C D)
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! Now I must read up the HyperSpec and see how it all ties together, especially for identical-tail-head. –  Chris Jester-Young Jul 13 '12 at 18:55

Since you mention "other language", Haskell is a kind-of Lispy language, and it does have idiomatic approach to what you're asking about.

longestPrefix xs ys = map fst (takeWhile (\(x,y) -> x == y) (zip xs ys))

zip pairs up the elements of its two argument lists, and takeWhile is self-descriptive.

For the second variant you'd just use reverse on arguments and on the result. The third is a bit more involved:

longestPrefixEnding xs ys =   -- '(a e d b c d) '(b c d a f)
  head [t  |  t <- tails xs, let p=longestPrefix t ys, p==t]

tails xs is equivalent to iterate tail xs i.e. the list [xs, tail xs, tail (tail xs), ...] ; tail is a synonym of cdr, and head - synonym of car:

Prelude Data.List> longestPrefix "abcef" "abdef"
"ab"
Prelude Data.List> longestPrefixEnding "aedbc" "bcdaf"
"bc"
Prelude Data.List> longestPrefixEnding "aebcabcd" "bcdaf"
"bcd"
Prelude Data.List> longestPrefixEnding "aebcabcdx" "bcdaf"
""
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.