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I am learning C# and I am trying this making my homeworks on image processing examples. I am trying to read the pixel values along an horizontal line in a gray levels jpeg image. Some prints I made inform me that I am reading a Format8bppIndexed image (this was a kind of surprise to me, because my belief was that jpeg images do not use a palette at all). The code to load the image in the proper control in the windows form is something like this:

 try
  {
       myImage = ( Bitmap ) Image.FromFile(imageName);
  }
  catch
  {
    MessageBox .Show("Unable to load the image" , Text, MessageBoxButtons .OK, MessageBoxIcon .Hand);
  }
  pictureBox1.Image = myImage ;  

Then I try to read the pixel along an arbitrary straight path in the image listing them in a csv file when pressing a button. I assume that, being the image a gray level one, reading the red color is enough (is it? other color components are equal; using the getBrightness seems to me an overkill):

  cursorStartx = 0;
  cursorStarty = 256;
  cursorEndx   = myImage.Width;
  cursorEndy   = 256;
  Color pixel;

StreamWriter fs = new StreamWriter( "pixels.csv" , true );
for (var i = 0; i < cursorEndx; i++)
{
  pixel = myImage.GetPixel(i, cursorStarty);
  fs.WriteLine( String .Format("{0}; {1}; {2}" , i, cursorStarty, pixel.R));
}
fs.Close();

When reading the cross section in the file I see values that make no sense at all: they are all multiple of 17 (???):

0; 256; 17
1; 256; 0
2; 256; 17
3; 256; 0
4; 256; 17
5; 256; 0
6; 256; 17
7; 256; 0
8; 256; 17
9; 256; 0
10; 256; 17
............
66; 256; 17
67; 256; 34
68; 256; 51
69; 256; 68
70; 256; 85
71; 256; 85
72; 256; 102
73; 256; 85

An histogram made in the same program shows clearly distinct count peaks at multiple of 17 (????)

Just to perform a reality check, I made something similar in Perl (I have a lot more experience in perl, I am just learning C#) using the module GD and, reading the pixel on the very same path in the same image, I get very different values.

First rows of the histogram drwan by imageJ are the following:

0   0
1   0
2   1
3   1
4   15
5   81
6   304
7   984
8   2362
9   206144
10  2582
11  1408
12  653
13  451
14  345
15  321
16  277
17  288

a quite different story.

Someone could possibly explain to me what horribly stupid kind of error I am doing?

Thanks a lot

----------------------------------- EDITED LATER --------------------------------------

Things are becoming intriguing. Reading the same image using Aforge image lab, written in C#, I got the same kind of error: the histogram shows discrete count at pixel values that are multiple of 17. Reading the image with ImageJ, written in Java, I get a correct histogram. Now I am trying to figure out if there is a way, using C#, to manage the image reading somehow, in order to be able to get the correct values, or this is a major issue and the alternatives are: to give up or to perform some sort of low level image reading (hard stuff for jpeg format...)

share|improve this question
    
Prooblem is not restricted to one image but several other images have the same problem. –  Daniel Jul 13 '12 at 20:15
    
Binary inspection shows that the image has been created by means of: JFIF Intel(R) JPEG Library, version [2.0.14.46] –  Daniel Jul 16 '12 at 17:50
    
Please upload one image showing this problem. –  vidstige Nov 3 '14 at 17:12

1 Answer 1

Multiples of 17 are actually quite common when converting 4bpp channels into 8bpp channels. 0x00, 0x11, 0x22 ... 0xFF are all multiples of 17.

Looks to me you have a quantized 16 colors grayscale image with dithering.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the advice, but opening the image with a completely different program, let'say: rsbweb.nih.gov/ij shows clearly a 8 bpp gray level image and the histogram looks good. –  Daniel Jul 13 '12 at 18:23
    
@Daniel Maybe you could upload the picture? –  Carra Jul 13 '12 at 18:30

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