Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So basically I am trying to create a script in bash shell which will emulate the windows delete features.

So instead of deleting a file or a folder it will move it to the recycle bin. I've got everything working apart from an issue I am having with moving folders into the recycle bin.

For example if I have a empty folder and run my script safe_rm it will not move the folder to the bin. However if I have a child folder in that parent folder it will delete both parent and child, so

safe_rm -r dir1/ <--wont delete

but

safe_rm dir1/ with content of dir2 file1 (dir1/file1 dir1/dir2) will delete.

Here is my code i am having an issue with

moveFilesFolder(){
 #check if file/directory exists
    if [ $(checkFileFolder $1) == "true" ]
    then
      movingFilesToRemove=$(ls $1)
      #if there's too many files/directories then send them to the moveFiles functions
      if [ ${#movingFilesToRemove[*]} -gt 1 ]
      then
        movingFiles $movingFilesToRemove
      else
      #folder handling  
        if [ $(isFolder $1) == "true" ]
        then
          #we check the rR flag for selected folder  
          if [ $optionRFlag == "false" ]
          then
            echo "rm: cannot remove \`$1': Is a directory"
         else
           lvlDown=true
           #we check if the I argument used on the folder,
               #which prompts the user
           if [ $optionIFlag == "true" ] && [ $(isFolderEmpty $1) == "false" ]
            then
              read -p "rm: descend into directory \`$1'?" downFolder
              case $downFolder in
              y* | Y*)
                lvlDown="true" ;;
              *)
                lvlDown="false" ;;
              esac

            fi
            if [ $lvlDown == "true" ]
            then
              #now we display all the descending folders and gives full path
              #i will be using the sed command to handle sub files 
              #this will proceed every item with present working folde
          subfiles=$(ls $1 | sed "s;^;`pwd`/$1;")
           # subfiles=$(ls $1 | grep '^d' )
           # subfiles=$(ls -R | grep ":" | sed "s/://" )  

           movingFiles $subfiles
            #now we move the empty folder 
              if [ $(isFolderEmpty $1) == "false" ]  
              then
                dlt=true
    if [ $optionIFlag == "true" ] 
    then
                 read -p "rm: remove directory \`$1'?" deleteFolder
                 case $deleteFolder in
                 y* | Y*)
                    dlt="true" ;;
                 *)
                    dlt="false" ;;
                 esac
               fi

               if [ $dlt == "true" ]
               then
                 mv $1 $recycleFolder
                echo `pwd` 
                 if [ $optionVFlag == "true" ]
                 then
                   echo "removed directory: \`$1'"
                 fi
               fi
             fi
           fi
         fi
       else
         #here we are dealing with file handling 
         agreed=true
         if [ $optionIFlag == "true" ]
         then
           read -p "$(interMessage $1)" userAccepts
           case $userAccepts in
           y* | Y*)
             agreed="true" ;;
           *)
             agreed="false" ;;
           esac
         fi
         #refer to above i flag
         if [ $agreed == "true" ]
         then

           mv $1 $recycleFolder
           echo `pwd`
           if [ $optionVFlag == "true" ]
           then
             echo "removed \`$1'"
           fi
         fi
       fi
     fi
   else

     echo "rm: cannot remove \`$1': No such file or directory"
   fi

}
share|improve this question
    
Is there a question here somewhere? That is a lot of code (and a lot of problems with it). Can you be more specific on where you are having trouble? Was it intended to only be able to delete a single file at a time rather than rm's ability to accept multiple file names? –  jordanm Jul 13 '12 at 19:15
    
The script is just meant to move a folder or a file recursively into another folder called recycle bin with the same options you give rm (-r -i -v -R) which it does, it just doesnt move a parent folder of a sub folder and it does –  Ergun Polat Jul 13 '12 at 21:29

2 Answers 2

See the comp.unix.questions faq, question 3.6: "How do I "undelete" a file?"

http://www.faqs.org/faqs/unix-faq/faq/part3/

Two points: first, this is generally accepted as a bad idea. You will become dependent upon this behaviour of "rm", and you will find yourself someday on a normal system where "rm" is really "rm", and you will get yourself in trouble. Second, you will eventually find that the hassle of dealing with the disk space and time involved in maintaining the trash bin, it might be easier just to be a bit more careful with "rm". For starters, you should look up the "-i" option to "rm" in your manual.

The MIT delete/undelete utility suite mentioned in the answer can be found at

http://ftp.funet.fi/pub/archive/comp.sources.misc/volume17/delete/

share|improve this answer
    
home can not be deleted created a folder called -i. Also dont understand why this has got to do with the script –  Ergun Polat Jul 13 '12 at 19:19
    
@Limpep If rm -i created a file called "-i", there is something seriously wrong with your rm. –  jordanm Jul 13 '12 at 19:35
    
@Limpep: What it has to do with your script is "don't do that". Period. Also, don't alias rm to rm -i. –  Dennis Williamson Jul 13 '12 at 19:39
    
No I created the folder -i so if I accidently trying deleting my home folder I get prompted. The code moves folders and files recursively into another localtion ie the recycle bin with save give options as rm –  Ergun Polat Jul 13 '12 at 19:39
    
The script is just meant to move a folder or a file into another folder called recycle bin with the same options you give rm (-r -i -v -R) which it does, it just doesnt move a parent folder of a sub folder and it does move(delete) multiple files. –  Ergun Polat Jul 13 '12 at 19:42

Where Trash Lives

Trash on most Linux systems lives in ~/.local/share/Trash/{expunged,files,info}. There are some subdirectories involved in tracking meta information, but you could just toss files or directories into ~/.local/share/Trash/files if you aren't worried about full trashspec compliance.

Poor Man's Trash

Even if you don't care about full trashspec compliance, you can still make use of the trash facility while making sure you comply with one of its key requirements. The trashspec says:

Even if a file with the same name and location gets trashed many times, each subsequent trashing must not overwrite a previous copy.

You could comply with the requirement with a basic shell function. For example:

trash () {
    local trashdir="$HOME/.local/share/Trash/files"
    mkdir -p "$trashdir"
    mv --backup=numbered "$@" "${trashdir}/"
}

Use a CLI Tool

If you are on a Debian-based system, you can install trash-cli. Once installed, you can call it directly or alias it for transparent use. For example:

sudo aptitude install trash-cli
alias rm='trash'

mkdir /tmp/foobarbaz
touch /tmp/foobarbaz
rm -rf /tmp/foobarbaz

Note that this doesn't seem to handle Ubuntu's ecryptfs-mounted home directories well, but otherwise gives you trashspec compliance out of the box without having to reinvent the wheel.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.