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in my work we do a lot of pair programming, and i wrote a function that ONLY accepts containers of a SINGLE type or its derivates, but my co-worker is afraid it will fail code review because it looks so damn ugly and says there's gotta be a better way:

here is the signature, the Fruit class is a base class that i renamed Fruit just for this thread:

template <class Container>
typename enable_if<is_base_of<Fruit, typename remove_pointer<typename Container::value_type>::type>::value, void>::type
processFruits(container& fruits)
{
    //process the elements and change them if needed. thats why no const
}

what it does is: returns void and enables the function IF its a container AND the type inside the container is a Fruit and/or derivided of fruit. i also used std::remove_pointer because i needed to know the "type" of the pointer (the container will most likely have pointers).

this compiles and works as intended, but as i said i don't know it its the best way to do it, it seems too verbose and might get cut of on code review.

EDIT: this also accepts templated classes, don't have to be containers. is there a way i can limit it to only accept STL containers?

any alternate ideas or is it fine like it is? thanks in advance.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is a bit horrible to read.

Well for starters you don't need to say enable_if<B, void> you can just say enable_if<B> and use the default template argument.

You can easily split it into separate pieces:

template <class T>
  struct is_fruity
  : is_base_of<Fruit, T>
  { };

template <class Container, typename Value = typename Container::value_type>
  struct is_fruit_container
  : is_fruity<typename remove_pointer<Value>::type>>
  { };

template<class Container>
  typename enable_if<is_fruit_container<Container>::value>::type
  processFruits(Container& fruits)
  {
    //process the elements and change them if needed. thats why no const
  }

If you have a compiler supporting alias templates you can make it even easier to read:

template<typename Cond>
  using Require = typename enable_if<Cond::value>::type;

template<class Container>
  Require<is_fruit_container<Container>>
  processFruits(Container& fruits)
  {
    //process the elements and change them if needed. thats why no const
  }

this also accepts templated classes, don't have to be containers. is there a way i can limit it to only accept STL containers?

I'm not sure what you mean by "templated classes", it only accepts types with a nested value_type type which is a type derived from Fruit or a pointer to such type, it doesn't have to be a template. To limit it to "STL containers" you need to write a trait to indentify an "STL container", however you want to define that. To do it properly you'd need a trait that tests for begin(), end(), size() members, as well as all the nested types specified by the container requirements, iterator, value_type, etc.

template<typename C, typename Chead, typename... Ctail>
struct static_and
{
  static const bool value = C::value && static_and<Chead, Ctail...>::value;
};

template<typename C>
struct static_and<C>
{
  static const bool value = C::value;
};

template<typename C>
struct is_container
: static_and<has_begin<C>, has_end<C>, has_iterator<C>, has_value_type<C> /* etc */>
{ };
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thanks a lot for the answer, that does look way easier to read, in fact i just changed the code and compiled it and everything worked. templates are so addicting its like I'm using prolog at college all over again. unfortunately no alias templates as we are using VS 2010 and i don't think it supports them.. anyway thanks again for the help :) –  sap Jul 13 '12 at 19:39

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