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Let's say I have a template class, IO<T> and another template class MembershipFunction<T>. I need to have a vector of MembershipFunction<T>*s in my IO thing, and also a std::map from std::string to MembershipFunction<T>*. For me, it's impossible to remember things in such a complex code. Especially when working with iterators. So I tried to add some typedefs to IO. But sounds like the compiler is not able to see nested templates. Errors are listed below.

What should I do to overcome?

#include <vector>
#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <utility>
#include "membership_function.h" // for the love of god! 
                                 // MembershipFunction is defined there!
#include "FFIS_global.h"


template <typename T>
class DLL_SHARED_EXPORT IO
{
private:
    typedef std::pair<std::string,  MembershipFunction<T>* > MapEntry; // (1)
    typedef std::map<std::string, MembershipFunction<T>* > Map; // (2)
    typedef std::vector<const MembershipFunction<T>* > Vector; // (3)
    // And so on...

These are errors:

(1) error: 'MembershipFunction' was not declared in this scope
(1) error: template argument 2 is invalid
(1) error: expected unqualified-id before '>' token
(2 and 3): same errors 

Edit:

This is code for MembershipFunction

template <typename T>
class DLL_SHARED_EXPORT MembershipFunction
{
public:
    virtual T value(const T& input) const{return T();}
    virtual void setImplicationMethod(const typename  MFIS<T>::Implication& method);
};
share|improve this question
    
did u include the MembershipFunction .h file? –  Yochai Timmer Jul 13 '12 at 19:39
    
@YochaiTimmer yes. –  sorush-r Jul 13 '12 at 19:43
    
What do you mean with nested typedef? Please show a minimal working example. –  TemplateRex Jul 13 '12 at 19:43
    
@rhalbersma well, that was nested template. And yes, it's not nested! I mean using a template class inside another... I don't know what's the correct term for that. –  sorush-r Jul 13 '12 at 19:46
1  
The first error says 'not defined in this scope'. So in which scope (class or namespace) is MembershipFunction defined? –  TemplateRex Jul 13 '12 at 19:48

2 Answers 2

I copy/pasted your code and it compiles fine with gcc. There is nothing wrong with your template usage. The compiler error says it hasn't seen the type before. I don't care that you include the file, the compiler doesn't see the full definition for some reason. A forward declaration may not be enough. It's also unclear what that DLL_SHARED_EXPORT is, I suspect that might be the culprit.

Before you downvote me, compile this and see for yourself:

#include <vector>
#include <map>
#include <utility>

template <typename T>
class  MembershipFunction
{
public:
    virtual T value(const T& input) const{return T();}
    //virtual void setImplicationMethod(const typename  MFIS<T>::Implication& method);
};


template <typename T>
class IO
{
private:
    typedef std::pair<std::string,  MembershipFunction<T>* > MapEntry; // (1)
    typedef std::map<std::string, MembershipFunction<T>* > Map; // (2)
    typedef std::vector<const MembershipFunction<T>* > Vector; // (3)
};
share|improve this answer
    
First of all, I didn't downwote any answer. Second, No need to test. I know it's working! IT SHOULD WORK. I'm struggling to find why my code is not compiling. Before using the code in a third class, everything compiled nicely. Then I added a list of IO objects to a class named Aggregator<T> (an empty class) and errors occurred. –  sorush-r Jul 13 '12 at 20:20
    
Thanks for the answer. That was circular inclusion. Though It's not solved yet! See the last comment on Mark's answer –  sorush-r Jul 13 '12 at 20:44

You have to define MembershipFunction before it can be used in IO, just make sure it comes first. If they're in separate files then #include the one in the other.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep. I already did. –  sorush-r Jul 13 '12 at 19:59
    
@sorush-r, there's nothing in your question to indicate that you did, and the error messages imply otherwise. "was not declared in this scope" means that the class name isn't recognized, either it isn't defined at all or it's defined in the wrong namespace. –  Mark Ransom Jul 13 '12 at 20:02
    
Okay, I edited my question. –  sorush-r Jul 13 '12 at 20:06
    
So, I'm sure that I included corresponding header and both classes are in same namespace. What else I should take care of? –  sorush-r Jul 13 '12 at 20:07
    
@sorush-r, the only other thing I can think of is that #if include guards in membership_function.h are preventing it from being seen. Does it #include any other files? –  Mark Ransom Jul 13 '12 at 20:09

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