Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Below is extracted from the section of the official South documentation on Team Workflow,

The second thing to note is that, when you pull in someone else’s model changes complete with their own migration, you’ll need to make a new empty migration that has the changes from both branches of development frozen in (if you’ve used mercurial, this is equivalent to a merge commit).

I don't see why the need for creating a new empty migration in this case. Shouldn't the developer just run ./manage.py migrate after pulling in the model changes (and the corresponding migrations) from others? What am I missing here?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe what that means is that if both branches have changes to the same model, then its better to merge the code and re-create a single migration script for those changes. This is because if branch1 has a 0006 migration script and branch2 has another 0006 migration script (you know how south names them sequentially...) then you can't correctly auto merge them since they are actually different files.

Hence you'd need to merge code changes and then re-create a migration script for the merged branch.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I get the idea but would like to know how to execute it in practice. Say, I am responsible for dealing with the two conflicting migrations. Do I create an empty migration and manually add the changes from both migrations, and delete the two original migrations? – tamakisquare Jul 18 '12 at 14:25
1  
No, you delete the two migrations. Merge the branches. And then run the command to create a new migration. Add the new file to your work tree and then commit. So something like: git merge branchtomerge; python manage.py schemamigration newapp --auto; git add newapp/migrations/0001...; git commit – Ashray Baruah Jul 18 '12 at 14:29
    
That makes much more sense. The official docs (the statement that I quoted above) suggest creating an empty migration to start with, which works too but it's kinda meaningless to do that. – tamakisquare Jul 18 '12 at 14:41

We had a problem related to this piece. Say we have a model:

class Article(Model):
    title = CharField()         

Developer 1 adds a field to it, say, author, on his branch (migration freezes title, author) Developer 2 adds a field date_published, on his branch (migration freezes title, date_published)

Then somebody merges two branches. What they get is two migrations where one doesn't know about date_published and the other one haven't seen field author.

What this could lead to is south trying to add author or date_published field (whatever migration was added last) next time you create auto migrations, because it simply doesn't know the 100% correct db state, it's not frozen inside migrations.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I get the idea but would like to know how to execute it in practice. Say, I am responsible for dealing with the two conflicting migrations. Do I create an empty migration and manually add the changes from both migrations, and delete the two original migrations? – tamakisquare Jul 18 '12 at 14:25
1  
The way I did it - merge that big dict inside migrations (with frozen db fields) by hand :/ – Dmitry Shevchenko Jul 18 '12 at 15:51
    
@DmitryShevchenko another way you could do this is: before merging development branch to master, make developer: rollback and delete conflicting migration, pull and merge master onto his development branch, apply migrations from master, create new migration, apply it, push development branch. – ryuusenshi May 28 '15 at 15:00

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.