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I have the following 2 tables in my database:

Address:

Street1
City
State
Zipcode

Customers:

Name
LocationAddressId (FK to Address table)
MailingAddressId (FK to address table)

I generated an Entity Framework model for this. When I create a customer object and populate only LocationAddress but not MailingAddress, an id (primary key for address table) is generated for LocationAddress. This id is assigned to LocationAddressId and the same id is being assigned to MailingAddressId as well.

Here is the code I have:

 Customer c = new Customer();
 var a = new Address
 {
        Street1 = "Test",
        City = "test",
        Zip = "43343",
        Country = "sdf",
 };

 c.Address = a;
 c.Name = "Test Customer";

 ctx.Customers.AddObject(c);
 ctx.SaveChanges();

After I save the changes, c.LocationAddressId and c.MailingAddressId are the same even though I didn't assign anything to Mailing Address.

Problem #2:

In my code, when I try to create MailingAddress as well, I get the error

"Unable to determine the principal end of the 'TestModel.FK_Customer_LocationAddress_Address' relationship. Multiple added entities may have the same primary key.

This is my code:

  Customer c = new Customer();
  var a = new Address
  {
        Street1 = "Test",
        City = "test",
        Zip = "43343",
        Country = "sdf",
  };

  c.Address = a;

  var b = new Address
  {
        Street1 = "Test mailing addr",
        City = "test",
        Zip = "43343",
        Country = "sdf",
  };

  c.Address1 = b;
  c.Name = "Test Customer";

  ctx.Customers.AddObject(c);
  ctx.SaveChanges();

I am not sure if I am creating the objects the right way. Does anyone have any ideas as to what is causing the issues?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Suggestion to start: take the foreign keys out of the customer table, create an address type in the address table, add the customer as a foreign key to the address table. This creates a many to one relationship between addresses and customers. i.e. customer has 2 stored addresses: a MAILING and PHYSICAL type. This allows you to add new address types if needed, e.g. SHIPPING, without needing another column. When that works, then work out how to do a many to many relationship (using a junction table) as more than one customer may live at the same address. Better DB design is easier to work with. –  BillR Jul 13 '12 at 20:35
    
Thanks for your answer. Please note that customers is not the only table in my database refering to address table. There are a ton of other tables referencing address table. –  TravelGirl Jul 14 '12 at 5:16

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