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The idea is to create a list of strings of a certain amount of characters preserving the order from the original list. The challenge is to accomplish it using only list comprehensions.

list_string = [ "aaa", "bb", "cc", "dd", "ee"]
str_len = 6
[some_list_comprehension]

The result should be something like ["aaabb", "ccddee"]. The string aaabb in the result list is 5 characters long, while the string ccddee is 6, that is because strings in the original list cannot be chunked. The order of the strings is relevant while creating the result, but irrelevant in the result, so that the end list could be ["ccddee", "aaabb"] but not ["eeddcc", "bbaaa"]. Each string appears in the result list just the same number of times as in the original, meaning that all possible combinations of the strings is not really the objective in this problem, mostly because each string in the result list is created following the order in the original. There are only 2 possible outputs:

["aaabb", "ccddee"]

or

["ccddee", "aaabb"]
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2  
This question was answered moments ago so why did you create this one? ( stackoverflow.com/questions/11476711/… ) –  Simeon Visser Jul 13 '12 at 20:22
1  
This sounds specifically like homework of some kind. Is that the case? What have you tried? –  g.d.d.c Jul 13 '12 at 20:22
3  
"The string aaabb in the result list is 5 characters long, while the string ccddee is 6, that is because strings in the original list cannot be chunked." Using only list comprehensions for this seems like a terrible idea. –  JAB Jul 13 '12 at 20:23
    
@SimeonVisser i posted a different question about strings and lists. this one has a very important difference. –  X.Jacobs Jul 13 '12 at 20:25
    
do you want only results that are as long as the given str_len? –  Claudiu Jul 13 '12 at 20:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ok, I think I got it, now. Is this what you were looking for?

>>> list_string = [ "aaa", "bb", "cc", "dd", "ee"]
>>> str_len = 6
>>> [[''.join(list_string[:i]), ''.join(list_string[i:])] for i in xrange(len(list_string)) if all(1 <= len(s) <= str_len for s in [''.join(list_string[:i]), ''.join(list_string[i:])])]
[['aaabb', 'ccddee']]

It yields all possible combinations that might have worked with one partitioning of the string. Here are all possible results:

>>> for str_len in range(len(''.join(list_string))):
        print str_len, [[''.join(list_string[:i]), ''.join(list_string[i:])] for i in xrange(len(list_string)) if all(1 <= len(s) <= str_len for s in [''.join(list_string[:i]), ''.join(list_string[i:])])]


0 []
1 []
2 []
3 []
4 []
5 []
6 [['aaabb', 'ccddee']]
7 [['aaabb', 'ccddee'], ['aaabbcc', 'ddee']]
8 [['aaa', 'bbccddee'], ['aaabb', 'ccddee'], ['aaabbcc', 'ddee']]
9 [['aaa', 'bbccddee'], ['aaabb', 'ccddee'], ['aaabbcc', 'ddee'], ['aaabbccdd', 'ee']]
10 [['aaa', 'bbccddee'], ['aaabb', 'ccddee'], ['aaabbcc', 'ddee'], ['aaabbccdd', 'ee']]

EDIT: Here is a version which uses filter but doesn't duplicate the result twice in the expression, and has nicer formatting:

>>> filter(
        lambda res: all(1 <= len(s) <= str_len for s in res),
        [[''.join(list_string[:i]), ''.join(list_string[i:])]
         for i in xrange(len(list_string))])
[['aaabb', 'ccddee']]
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Thanks to your question I decided that this must be what the OP was after (modulo a possible permutation which he should be able to do himself), and so deleted mine as answering a different question. –  DSM Jul 13 '12 at 20:54
    
yes! seems we are getting somewhere here :) –  X.Jacobs Jul 13 '12 at 20:55
    
sweet. can i ask what you are trying to do? hah. the only thing i don't like about my answer is i have to duplicate the result twice so i can filter it. EDIT: answer edited to avoid that, but it does use filter and not only list comprehensions.. –  Claudiu Jul 13 '12 at 20:57
    
@Claudiu well by now this is the best solution. it is to create urls of certain size using strings in a list –  X.Jacobs Jul 13 '12 at 21:03
    
oh, cute, trying to make a site like socuteurl? –  Claudiu Jul 13 '12 at 21:11
from itertools import combinations
list_string = [ "aaa", "bb", "cc", "dd", "ee"]
minn=min(map(len,list_string))
maxx=max(map(len,list_string))
str_len=6
lis=[''.join(x) for i in range(1,maxx+1) for x in combinations(list_string,i) if len(''.join(x))<=str_len]        
print lis

output:

['aaa', 'bb', 'cc', 'dd', 'ee', 'aaabb', 'aaacc', 'aaadd', 'aaaee', 'bbcc', 'bbdd', 'bbee', 'ccdd', 'ccee', 'ddee', 'bbccdd', 'bbccee', 'bbddee', 'ccddee']
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this doesn't only use list comprehensions –  Claudiu Jul 13 '12 at 20:26
    
@Claudiu solution edited. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 13 '12 at 20:28
    
nice, but not really interested in all possible combinations... –  X.Jacobs Jul 13 '12 at 20:32
    
@XianJacobs solution edited, is this is what you're looking for? –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jul 13 '12 at 20:52

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