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Triggered from this question about setf expanders: defining setf-expanders in Common Lisp

When writing setf expanders for user-defined getters, I commonly find that there is code duplication in the getter and setter, as far as how the property is retrieved. For example:

CL-USER>
(defun new-car (lst)
  (car lst))
NEW-CAR
CL-USER> 
(defun (setf new-car) (new-value lst)
  (setf (car lst) new-value))
(SETF NEW-CAR)
CL-USER> 
(defparameter *lst* (list 5 4 3))
*LST*
CL-USER> 
*lst*
(5 4 3)
CL-USER> 
(setf (new-car *lst*) 3)
3
CL-USER> 
*lst*
(3 4 3)
CL-USER> 

Note how the (car lst) form, the actual accessor that already has a setf expander defined, is in both defuns. This has always annoyed me somewhat. It would be nice to be able to say on the first defun, 'hey, I'm defining a defun that's a getter, but I also want it to have a typical setf expander'.

Is there any way with the common lisp standard to express this? Has anyone else worried about this issue, and defined a macro that does this?

To be clear, what I'd like here is a way to define a getter and typical setter, where the way that the getter compiles down to common lisp forms that already have setters ((car lst), e.g.) is written only once in the code.

I also understand there are times where you wouldn't want to do this, b/c the setter needs to perform some side effects before setting the value. Or it's an abstraction that actually sets multiple values, or whatever. This question is less relevant in that situation. What I'm talking about here is the case where the setter does the standard thing, and just sets the place of the getter.

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you want can be achieved with the use of macros.

(defmacro define-place (name lambda-list sexp)
  (let ((value-var (gensym)))
    `(progn
       (defun ,name ,lambda-list
         ,sexp)

       (defun (setf ,name) (,value-var ,@lambda-list)
         (setf ,sexp ,value-var)))))

(define-place new-chr (list)
  (car list))

More information on macros can be found in Peter Seibel's book, Practical Common Lisp. Chapter 10 of Paul Graham's book "ANSI Common Lisp" is another reference.

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Yep; this works; I'm going to wait a bit to see if I get alternative implementations. –  Clayton Stanley Jul 14 '12 at 5:50
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Working from Mark's approach, Rainer's post on macro-function, and Amalloy's post on transparent macrolet, I came up with this:

(defmacro with-setters (&body body)
  `(macrolet ((defun-mod (name args &body body)
                `(,@(funcall (macro-function 'defun)
                             `(defun ,name ,args ,@body) nil))))
     (macrolet ((defun (name args &body body)
                  `(progn
                     (defun-mod ,name ,args ,@body)
                     (defun-mod (setf ,name) (new-val ,@args)
                                (setf ,@body new-val)))))
       (progn
         ,@body))))

To use:

Clozure Common Lisp Version 1.8-r15286M  (DarwinX8664)  Port: 4005  Pid: 41757
; SWANK 2012-03-06
CL-USER>
(with-setters
 (defun new-car (lst)
    (car lst))
 (defun new-first (lst)
    (first lst)))
(SETF NEW-FIRST)
CL-USER>
(defparameter *t* (list 5 4 3))
*T*
CL-USER>
(new-car *t*)
5
CL-USER>
(new-first *t*)
5
CL-USER>
(setf (new-first *t*) 3)
3
CL-USER>
(new-first *t*)
3
CL-USER>
*t*
(3 4 3)
CL-USER>
(setf (new-car *t*) 9)
9
CL-USER>
*t*
(9 4 3)

There are some variable capture issues here that should probably be attended to, before using this macro in production code.

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