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Here's an extension of the sample node.js code:

var express = require('express');
var application = express.createServer();

var redis = require("redis"),
    client = redis.createClient();

client.on("error", function (err) {
    console.log("Error " + err);
});

client.set("test key", "TEST KEY VALUE", redis.print);

application.get('/', function(request, response) {
        client.get('test key', function(err, value) {
            client.quit();
            response.send('The value of "test key" is: ' + value);
        });
});

application.listen(2455);

The server starts up fine, but when accessed, the page loads for a while eventually erroring out - "No data received."

I have redis running, the keys save fine, I can also access them via client.get() juts fine in node's repl.

I think I'm missing some theory on how async programs work.

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Do you get the same behavior if you use response.end instead of response.send? –  BinaryMuse Jul 13 '12 at 21:34
    
I'm not sure now, but I fixed the problem just now - shouldn't have quit the client inside the get(). Next time a request comes in, the client is disconnected. –  dsp_099 Jul 13 '12 at 21:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I do not think Redis/redis libraries require you to kill the client connection explicitly. Even if you do, you need to ensure that the successful or error callbacks have been invoked & handled before quitting the client.

Hope it helps.

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There is possibility that you receive an error, and because you are not checking err variable before res.send, your application returns nothing. Try to add something like: if(err) throw err; after client.get and check STDOUT

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