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Standardese:

[class.ctor] 12.1/1 says

A special declarator syntax is used to declare or define the constructor. The syntax uses:

    — an optional decl-specifier-seq in which each decl-specifier is either a function-specifier or constexpr,

    — the constructor’s class name, and

    — a parameter list

in that order.

[class.name] 9.1/4 says

A typedef-name (7.1.3) that names a class type, or a cv-qualified version thereof, is also a class-name. If a typedef-name that names a cv-qualified class type is used where a class-name is required, the cv-qualifiers are ignored. A typedef-name shall not be used as the identifier in a class-head.

Also [expr.prim.general] 5.1.1/8 says

Where class-name :: class-name is used, and the two class-names refer to the same class, this notation names the constructor (12.1).


Application:

This seems to me to say that declaring a constructor should be allowed using typedef names (despite the fact that 12.1/1 doesn't use an italicized class-name).

For example, given:

struct Foo;
typedef Foo Bar;

then

struct Foo { Bar() {} }; // defines Foo's constructor. - 1

or instead given

struct Foo;
struct Foo { Foo() };
typedef Foo Bar;

then

Foo::Bar() {}; // defines Foo's constructor - 2

or

Bar::Bar() {}; // defines Foo's constructor - 3

or

Bar::Foo() {}; // defines Foo's constructor - 4

Any of these should be legal. However nobody seems to accept definitions 2 or 3, MSVC accepts 1, and MSVC, clang, and gcc all accept 4.

Is my analysis correct, and are all these compilers wrong?

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6  
(1) seems to be ruled out by §12.1/3 ("A typedef-name shall not be used as the class-name in the declarator-id for a constructor declaration.") –  Philipp Jul 13 '12 at 22:10
    
@Philipp: That's the answer. –  Xeo Jul 13 '12 at 22:10
    
@Xeo OK, posted as answer. –  Philipp Jul 13 '12 at 22:15
    
You should clarify which version of the standard you're referring to, C++03 (aka ISO/IEC 14882:2003) or C++11 (ISO/IEC 14882:2011); I pray you're not referring to C++98. –  Adam Rosenfield Jul 13 '12 at 22:21
1  
@AdamRosenfield C++11, but I don't think that C++11 has changed anything in this regard. –  bames53 Jul 13 '12 at 22:23
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1 Answer

up vote 10 down vote accepted

§12.1/3 of the working draft N3337 (Feb 2012) states

A typedef-name shall not be used as the class-name in the declarator-id for a constructor declaration.

This rules out (1).

§12.1/1 seems to use the term "declaration" for both declarations and definitions:

A special declarator syntax is used to declare or define the constructor. […] In such a declaration, […]

(without referring to "definitions" explicitly). I think it's a bit unclear whether this applies to out-of-class definitions or only to inline definitions. If it applies to all kinds of definitions, this would rule out (2) and (3) as well. (4) should be legal in any case.

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@barnes53: I don't know what answer you're reading, but this one doesn't mention class-head, and it does mention a constructor declaration... which the code in your comment clearly is not. He cited a completely different rule from the one you mentioned in your question. 12.1p3 as opposed to 9.1p4. –  Ben Voigt Jul 13 '12 at 22:20
    
@BenVoigt you're right, I skimmed too quickly over the text following "A typedef-name shall not be used" –  bames53 Jul 13 '12 at 22:22
    
I'm not sure I follow on why (2) and (3) are ruled about by this. Where is it said that "declaration" means both declarations and definitions? –  bames53 Jul 13 '12 at 22:28
    
@bames53 : In §12.1/1 it says "A special declarator syntax is used to declare or define the constructor. ... In such a declaration, ..." so I think all further uses of the word "declaration" in §12.1 are actually referring to this "special declarator". –  ildjarn Jul 13 '12 at 22:33
    
@ildjarn I think that's the intended meaning, but the presented syntax (decl-specifiers + class name + parameter list) does not match out-of-class definitions since they contain nested name specifiers rather than unqualified class names. –  Philipp Jul 13 '12 at 22:37
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