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I have two classes which both derive from the same parent:

public class People{
    public string BetterFoot;

    public override bool Equals(object obj){
        if (obj == null || this.GetType() != obj.GetType())
            return false;
        People o = (People)obj;
        return (this.BetterFoot == o.BetterFoot);
    }

public class LeftiesOrRighties: People{
    public string BetterHand;

    public override bool Equals(object obj){
        if (obj == null || this.GetType() != obj.GetType())
            return false;
        LeftiesOrRighties o = (LeftiesOrRighties)obj;
        return (this.BetterFoot == o.BetterFoot) &&
        (this.BetterHand == o.BetterHand)
    }
}

public class Ambidextrous: People{
    public string FavoriteHand;
}

(There are GetHashCodes in there, too, but I know that they work.) I'd like to compare collections of them, based on their root Equals():

ThoseOneHanded = new List<LeftiesOrRighties>(){new LeftiesOrRighties(){BetterFoot = "L"}};
ThoseTwoHanded = new List<Ambidextrous>(){new Ambidextrous(){BetterFoot = "L"}};
//using NUnit
Assert.That ((People)ThoseOneHanded[0], Is.EqualTo((People)ThoseTwoHanded[0])));

Unfortunately, this returns false.

Why? Shouldn't the casting make them (for all intents and purposes, if not exactly) the same type, and thus use the base methods? And if not, how do I truly cast the underlying type back to People?

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1  
= is the assignment operator. == is used for equality comparison. –  Odrade Jul 13 '12 at 23:30
    
@Odrade corrected. –  Arithmomaniac Jul 14 '12 at 0:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As Bob Vale pointed out cast does not change type.

Standard solution used across the .Net framework is to use custom object implementing IEqualityComparer or its generic variant. Than your compare/find method takes 2 objects/collections and use comparer to perform custom comparison.

I.e. many LINK methods take custom compare to find/filter objects like Enumerable.Distinct

public static IEnumerable<TSource> Distinct<TSource>(
    this IEnumerable<TSource> source,
    IEqualityComparer<TSource> comparer
)

Sample comparer:

class Last3BitsComparer : IEqualityComparer<int>
{

  public bool Equals(int b1, int b2)
  {
    return (b1 & 3) == (b2 & 3);
  }
  public int GetHashCode(int bx)
  {
    return bx & 3;
  }
}
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Cast doesn't change the object itself, so the result of GetType will always be the same and so your this.GetType() != obj.GetType() will be true and so the function will return false.

The following logic could potentially gain the behaviour you want (and you don't need to cast to People)

public class People{ 
  public string BetterFoot; 

  public override bool Equals(object obj){ 
    People o = obj as People;
    if (o==null) return false;
    return (this.BetterFoot = o.BetterFoot); 
} 

public class LeftiesOrRighties: People{ 
  public string BetterHand; 

  public override bool Equals(object obj){ 
    LeftiesOrRighties o = obj as LeftiesOrRighties; 
    if (o==null) return base.Equals(obj);
    return (this.BetterFoot = o.BetterFoot) && 
    (this.BetterHand = o.BetterHand) 
  } 
} 

public class Ambidextrous: People{ 
  public string FavoriteHand; 
} 
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