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I have inherited some code. I see that this code exists:

private List<int> Data { get; set; }

private CsClipboard()
{
    Data = new List<int>();
}

public List<int> ComponentIDs
{
    get
    {
        return Data;
    }
    set
    {
        Data.Clear();
        Data = value;
    }
}

I don't see any reason to call clear before setting Data to value. I'm wondering if there are scenarios in C# where I would want to call clear before setting the value aside from something like triggering an OnClear event. It's a fairly large code base with tech. debt, so just being overly cautious.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

That code could have some nasty side affects.

What happens there is that the original list gets cleared. so every other place in the code that holds the original list will now hold an empty list.

Every new get request will hold the new list. But the the data isn't concurrent across the program.

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In general, you should avoid public properties that return a mutable list. Once a consumer gets a reference to it, you no longer have a guarantee on the state of what should be an internal detail. Clearing the list in a setter only exacerbates the issue, because now you are clearing a list that a consumer might still have a reference to (even though it is no longer the correct list.)

You should consider changing the property so that it returns a copy (preferably read-only) of the current state of the list. The AsReadOnly() method can help here. If you can't do that, at least don't clear the list before setting the new value.

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Oh I agree completely that its horrible. Just trying to manage it right now without breaking anything that I dont know exists so I can't test. :) –  Sean Anderson Jul 14 '12 at 0:25

I would want to call clear before setting the value aside from something like triggering an OnClear event.

The List class does not have events MSDN

So how about writing you own custom Clear method for the list

I mean extension method for the list class that will use your Clear method with your custom logic

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I don't see how this is related to this question. –  Tim Schmelter Jul 13 '12 at 23:39
1  
@TimSchmelter the OP have this line in post "I would want to call clear before setting the value aside from something like triggering an OnClear event." so I am answering that part –  HatSoft Jul 13 '12 at 23:39

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