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I'm trying to produce a flow diagram of a tree structure. I've been able to create representative graphs with networkx, but I need a way to show the tree structure when I output a plot. I'm using matplotlib.pylab to plot the graph.

I need to show the data in a structure similar to what is shown here. Although I don't have sub-graphs.

How can I guarantee a structure like that?

Examples for the unbelievers:

Various NetworkX layouts

I've been able to show the graphs with pylab and graphviz, but neither offer the tree structure I'm looking for. I've tried every layout networkx has to offer, but none of them show a hierarchy. I've just not sure what options/mode to give it OR if I need to use weights. Any suggestions would help a bunch.

@jterrace:

Here's a rough outline of what I used to produce the plots above. I've added some labels, but other than that it's the same.

import networkx as nx
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
G = nx.Graph()

G.add_node("ROOT")

for i in xrange(5):
    G.add_node("Child_%i" % i)
    G.add_node("Grandchild_%i" % i)
    G.add_node("Greatgrandchild_%i" % i)

    G.add_edge("ROOT", "Child_%i" % i)
    G.add_edge("Child_%i" % i, "Grandchild_%i" % i)
    G.add_edge("Grandchild_%i" % i, "Greatgrandchild_%i" % i)

plt.title("draw_networkx")
nx.draw_networkx(G)

plt.show()
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2 Answers 2

up vote 29 down vote accepted

If you use a directed graph then the Graphviz dot layout will do something like you want with the tree. Here is some code similar to the above solutions that shows how to do that

import networkx as nx
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
G = nx.DiGraph()

G.add_node("ROOT")

for i in xrange(5):
    G.add_node("Child_%i" % i)
    G.add_node("Grandchild_%i" % i)
    G.add_node("Greatgrandchild_%i" % i)

    G.add_edge("ROOT", "Child_%i" % i)
    G.add_edge("Child_%i" % i, "Grandchild_%i" % i)
    G.add_edge("Grandchild_%i" % i, "Greatgrandchild_%i" % i)

# write dot file to use with graphviz
# run "dot -Tpng test.dot >test.png"
nx.write_dot(G,'test.dot')

# same layout using matplotlib with no labels
plt.title("draw_networkx")
pos=nx.graphviz_layout(G,prog='dot')
nx.draw(G,pos,with_labels=False,arrows=False)
plt.savefig('nx_test.png')

Graphviz output

NetworkX/Matplotlib output

share|improve this answer
    
Ah ha! So all I needed was a directed graph with the 'dot' layout. I knew it was something very small. Thanks a lot Aric! –  max Jul 14 '12 at 21:37
    
Is there any good way to label the nodes ascendingly? By that I mean, I create a graph g = nx.full_rary_tree(2, 10) If I print the edges I get: [(0, 1), (0, 2), (1, 3), (1, 4), (2, 5), ... ] but it will visualize them in a different order... –  CodeKingPlusPlus Nov 6 '13 at 5:26
    
What ordering do you want? See bfs_edges() and dfs_edges(). –  Aric Nov 6 '13 at 13:15
    
For any interested readers wanting to do this in python 3 (graphviz currently won't work there), try this question –  Joel Apr 13 at 4:27
    
PyGrapviz works with Python 3 and this code will work with Python 3. –  Aric Apr 13 at 12:10

You can use pygraphviz to get close:

>>> import pygraphviz
>>> import networkx
>>> import networkx as nx
>>> G = nx.Graph()
>>> G.add_node("ROOT")
>>> for i in xrange(5):
...     G.add_node("Child_%i" % i)
...     G.add_node("Grandchild_%i" % i)
...     G.add_node("Greatgrandchild_%i" % i)
...     G.add_edge("ROOT", "Child_%i" % i)
...     G.add_edge("Child_%i" % i, "Grandchild_%i" % i)
...     G.add_edge("Grandchild_%i" % i, "Greatgrandchild_%i" % i)

>>> A = nx.to_agraph(G)
>>> A.layout('dot', args='-Nfontsize=10 -Nwidth=".2" -Nheight=".2" -Nmargin=0 -Gfontsize=8')
>>> A.draw('test.png')

Result: enter image description here

Note I copied the graphviz options from the link you posted above. I'm not sure why the 4th child is drawn on top instead of in strictly vertical format. Maybe someone who knows more about the Graphviz options can help with that.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks. This was exactly what I was seeing when I tried it. I find it somewhat strange why it produced something like this. –  max Jul 14 '12 at 21:35

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